Chuck Shute Podcast

Sean McNabb (Quiet Riot, Great White, Dokken, Sons of Anarchy)

September 03, 2020 Sean McNabb Season 2 Episode 55
Chuck Shute Podcast
Sean McNabb (Quiet Riot, Great White, Dokken, Sons of Anarchy)
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Chuck Shute Podcast
Sean McNabb (Quiet Riot, Great White, Dokken, Sons of Anarchy)
Sep 03, 2020 Season 2 Episode 55
Sean McNabb

Episode #55- Sean McNabb is a musician who has played in bands such as Quiet Riot, Great White and Dokken.  Sean is also an actor and has appeared in TV shows such as "Sons of Anarchy" as well as moves like "Four Christmases" and "Street Survivors: The True Story of the Lynyrd Skynrd Plane Crash"

0:00:00 - Intro
0:01:09 - Frankie Banali (Quiet Riot Drummer)
0:03:25 - Inspired by The Who's "Tommy"
0:04:47 - Learning to Play Music
0:06:22 - Bar Bands & Offer to Join Saraya
0:09:01 - Moving to L.A. & Making Connections
0:12:20 - Joining Quiet Riot
0:14:03 - Frank Banali Memories
0:17:10 - Mike Starr from Alice In Chains
0:21:04 - Craig Gass & Sobriety
0:21:48 - Great White & Producer Jack Blades
0:24:55 - Poison, Ratt & L.A. Guns Tour
0:27:30 - Mushrooms & Bottle Rocket Fight
0:30:10 - Great White Station Nightclub Fire
0:33:13 - Don Dokken  & George Lynch
0:37:25 - Music for Commercials & TV Shows
0:39:03 - Resume & LinkedIn
0:40:00 - Getting S.A.G. Card
0:41:25 - Four Christmases w/ Dwight Yokam
0:44:01 - Sons of Anarchy & Booze Fighters
0:46:54 - Rock Story & Eric Roberts & Acting
0:49:40 - TV Pilots & Auditions
0:53:00 - Sobriety & Party Rock Stars
0:55:45 - Healthy Living
0:57:45 - Secret To Success
0:59:10 - Future Plans With Acting & Music
1:01:15 - Music Vs Acting
1:02:05 - Turning Down Offers
1:03:55 - Opinion of Egos
1:05:45 - Sean's Wife & Wednesday's Child
1:08:00 - Brown M&Ms & Gilby Clarke
1:10:00 - Rock n Roll Zombie Apocalypse
1:10:50 - Street Survivors: Lynyrd Skynyrd Movie
1:11:56 - Tora Tora & Monsters of Rock
1:12:50 - Wrap Up

Sean McNabb Instagram:
https://instagram.com/seanmcnabbla/

Wednesday’s Child:
https://www.foxla.com/tag/series/wednesdays-child

Chuck Shute Instagram:
https://instagram.com/chuck_shute/

Support the show (https://venmo.com/Chuck-Shute)

Show Notes Transcript

Episode #55- Sean McNabb is a musician who has played in bands such as Quiet Riot, Great White and Dokken.  Sean is also an actor and has appeared in TV shows such as "Sons of Anarchy" as well as moves like "Four Christmases" and "Street Survivors: The True Story of the Lynyrd Skynrd Plane Crash"

0:00:00 - Intro
0:01:09 - Frankie Banali (Quiet Riot Drummer)
0:03:25 - Inspired by The Who's "Tommy"
0:04:47 - Learning to Play Music
0:06:22 - Bar Bands & Offer to Join Saraya
0:09:01 - Moving to L.A. & Making Connections
0:12:20 - Joining Quiet Riot
0:14:03 - Frank Banali Memories
0:17:10 - Mike Starr from Alice In Chains
0:21:04 - Craig Gass & Sobriety
0:21:48 - Great White & Producer Jack Blades
0:24:55 - Poison, Ratt & L.A. Guns Tour
0:27:30 - Mushrooms & Bottle Rocket Fight
0:30:10 - Great White Station Nightclub Fire
0:33:13 - Don Dokken  & George Lynch
0:37:25 - Music for Commercials & TV Shows
0:39:03 - Resume & LinkedIn
0:40:00 - Getting S.A.G. Card
0:41:25 - Four Christmases w/ Dwight Yokam
0:44:01 - Sons of Anarchy & Booze Fighters
0:46:54 - Rock Story & Eric Roberts & Acting
0:49:40 - TV Pilots & Auditions
0:53:00 - Sobriety & Party Rock Stars
0:55:45 - Healthy Living
0:57:45 - Secret To Success
0:59:10 - Future Plans With Acting & Music
1:01:15 - Music Vs Acting
1:02:05 - Turning Down Offers
1:03:55 - Opinion of Egos
1:05:45 - Sean's Wife & Wednesday's Child
1:08:00 - Brown M&Ms & Gilby Clarke
1:10:00 - Rock n Roll Zombie Apocalypse
1:10:50 - Street Survivors: Lynyrd Skynyrd Movie
1:11:56 - Tora Tora & Monsters of Rock
1:12:50 - Wrap Up

Sean McNabb Instagram:
https://instagram.com/seanmcnabbla/

Wednesday’s Child:
https://www.foxla.com/tag/series/wednesdays-child

Chuck Shute Instagram:
https://instagram.com/chuck_shute/

Support the show (https://venmo.com/Chuck-Shute)

Chuck Shute :

Welcome to the show everybody. Thanks for listening. Still high off my last interview with Ugly Kid Joe guitarist and Godsmack and Evanescence producer, Dave Fortman. That was such a great interview. So much fun and this one's just gonna keep the streak going. We've got another huge guest today, Sean McNabb, he is so amazing. I can't believe this guy's resume. He's been so many huge bands from Quiet Riot to Dokken and he was in Great White for a long time but you'll find out why he often leaves that one off his resume. So we discussed that pluses acting, which includes a movie Four Christmases, Sons of Anarchy street survivors, which is the Leonard's movie. I haven't seen that one yet. I want to see that. And we talked about that. Plus he has a lot of fun stories, some sad stories and just a lot of overall great stuff. Enjoy it. So first off I do need to offer my condolences on your former bandmate and friend, I'm assuming Frankie Banali. That's really sad about that.

Sean McNabb :

Yes, thank you. Yeah, it's been a tough couple of about a week and a half. And I owe Frankie a lot. Frankie, basically getting my first job nationally and Quiet Riot. Yeah, I was 20 years old. So he basically gave me my start in the business. And I had been in L.A. for two weeks and went out to the CatHouse- Rikki (Rachtman) and Taime's (Downe) Cathouse one night and was introduced to Frankie. And he goes, Hey, come on. We're auditioning bass players once you come over to the valley tomorrow, and let's see.... Let's meet you. And maybe record a track and see how goes... and it worked out for me.

Chuck Shute :

Yeah...

Sean McNabb :

I got a lot lot to thank Frankie for... great man.

Chuck Shute :

Did you keep in touch with them throughout the years like did you I mean you must had run ins because some of these a lot of these bands that you've been and I'm sure you guys toured together or did shows or festivals together? Absolutely did we always were playing together? And then I don't know if you knew this too but I also went back and I think it was 2000 Yeah, it is summer with Kevin and Frankie. And that was uh, so I think I'm the only bass player that has played with shortino and Kevin yeah shortino Man, I just listened to that your album with him? I didn't realize like how he really has like the David Coverdale Robert Plant sound. I mean it's, it's really phenomenal. I never notice how good of a singer he really is. shortino special, you know, he He He's so soulful. We call him a blue eyed soul singer. Yeah. All those great soul singers, Sam Cooke, you know, all the Motown guys smokey, he came from all that and of course then the the rock guys, you know you're covered deals and you're Paul Rogers and all that. So he's got all that he's amazing. Yeah. Well let's talk about you so let's back up a little you grew up in South Bend Indiana and your brother was a drummer, your parents played like the Beatles, Steppenwolf, you know, LP Jimi Hendrix. You kind of grew up with that sound, but it really was around what was like nine or 10 you went to go see the who, or sorry, Tommy the movie by the who and that's kind of what really inspired you to actually like pick up an instrument, right? Absolutely. I was very lucky. My parents were into music and I grew up in that era, you know, with the incense the beaded curtains in the waterbeds and He's rock, you know, but in my opinion, some of the best, you know? Yes and very like the Beatles all that, you know, my parents always were playing good music and, and yes, then my mother dropped me off at a matinee. I'll never forget it. That day changed my life of the movie Tommy. And you know if you've seen it, you know, it's a, it's kind of out there and avant garde movie. And for a 10 year old, I didn't really understand a whole lot of it, but I knew I gravitated towards music, and then who's music and john Entwistle and I kind of walked out of that theater. That's what I want to do you know, that day. So is this around the time you started playing the bass? Did you take lessons or were you self taught? I'm always curious with that kind of stuff. My mother had a she had a classical guitar, and she kind of gave that to me in it. You know, you play that with your fingers and stuff so that I started playing with my fingers and that just felt kind of natural. And that I that led to bass getting involved in the school band, you know, they they needed a bass player. I'm like, oh, let's try that. I had played trumpet and drums before that my brother being a drummer could never get a sound on the trumpet. And my brother was a much better drummer. So I thought, okay, let's, let's try this bass guitar thing. So then, and Did you do any acting as a child because I know we'll get into the acting thing, but I know you later would do movies and TV did you do acting in high school plays or anything like that? Absolutely. I was around drama and drama classes. early on. In my church was actually Unitarian Church. My mother was going to and took us to and we had we got into drum classes that have very early age, so I've been kind of around that my entire life. And then when rock and roll kind of took over, and you know, I got got away from that for a while, but 1516 years ago, I got back into the acting thing. Yeah, that's right. Yeah. So we'll get to that. But so with your music career at this point around High School, you are you are kind of playing a lot of bar bands in the Midwest and Florida and then before even quiet, right, you got an offer to play in that band. Is it so how do you say it sariah so Ray, which Ray actual Sandy Saran great, great singer, but it was actually called alsace-lorraine before they got their deal. Okay, so yeah, going back, you know, we used to play in these bar bands around the Midwest in Florida, you know, and it was great for honing our chops. You know, we played all the top 40 stuff so that helped Maybe a lot more well rounded musically, you know, when you were playing all the hits the top 40 you know, you were playing a little bit of funk, a lot of rock, you know, pop, you know, just a vast, you know, variety of music and that that really helped me cut my chops as a young musician coming up and you know, you played three, four sets a night. So it was great training. And I did that in many bands in the Midwest and then two bands in Florida that worked all the time. And then I got that offer to go to New York moved to New York and join which became Surya they had a deal on polygram and I moved from Florida in beautiful weather to winter time in New York City and what a what an eye opening experience that Yeah, yeah, so that actually had the this is a little bit of a deep cut for some of my listeners who might not know a lot about music, but It was like the original danger danger guitarist Tony Bruno re which he went on to do a lot of like work with was a Janet Jackson all sorts of stuff. He was in that band too, right? Ah, I don't think Tony was I think it was Sandy Greg. And oh man, I can't remember the guitar players name but he was really really good. Oh, maybe he joined. Yeah, I don't know. He was really, really good. He was friends and Ray Gill. Oh, yeah, he's Yeah. Actually recommended me. Well, I'm not trying to jump forward. But here was the deal. I went out there things were taking a long time with Saran up on their feet to do everything and I ended up moving back to Indiana for a while. Yeah. And in hopes to move to LA and joined another band there for a few months and then was off on my way to work. Les Tell me about moving to LA like did you have a plan? When you move to LA like you didn't have a job lined up? Do you have money saved up? Did you have? I'm always curious with these kinds of like, this is a big move for you. Did you have like your car full of your belongings or it was just like a one way bus ticket in a suitcase or? Yes, thanks for asking that question. No, I had a dream and two bases, an SVT and a Nissan stanza. I think I had, I think I had 200 bucks in my pocket. And this friend of mine from Louisville, I say Louisville because that's the way you say it if you're from Lou,

Unknown Speaker :

Louisville,

Chuck Shute :

okay, but this friend of mine, she goes, Hey, if you help me move out, if you follow me out there in my u haul, you can stay on my couch, for you know, a month or two until you get on your feet or whatever, find a job. And I thought that's a great opportunity. Let's do that. Let's prime real estate Especially now as I count you know, because rent in LA a couch would be I mean even a couch probably that you could probably get 1000 bucks for a couch I think I interviewed this comedian and he shared a room with some old guy met on Craigslist I think he was still paying like 500 bucks they had to share a bedroom and like even share like the floor they didn't have a bed um, is there. So that's like a pretty good deal again for free then. It was amazing too, because that I moved in right on Sunset and gardener which is right by the Guitar Center, all those guitar shops at the time. And in my building. were some people that really knew a lot of people in the scene. Betsy browning. I don't know if you know who that is. But she knew everybody. And this girl Tina. She was actually the one that took me to the cat house when I met Frankie and got to get in quite right. But uh, you would see like Rudy sarzo I met him early on and so I had him on no would come near and dear friend and he's been so help me in my career and then just becoming a an adult. But am one of my heroes, you know, we'll get to that in a minute. So this building had a lot of traffic, foot traffic of a lot of the guys that, you know, I was into their bands and that's that kind of music. I was at the right place at the right time. And I was very, very lucky. I got in quiet Riot two and a half weeks after I hit town.

Unknown Speaker :

Wow,

Chuck Shute :

that is like that is a really amazing story. Because you hear some stories, it's like years of grinding. I mean, you were probably grinding in those other bands and things but that's pretty well yeah, two weeks in. So part of it is kind of knowing people and kind of getting into the plugged into the scene and stuff and it sure is, you know, and I really believe it was kind of a god kind of destiny thing. You know, because I had worked real hard and, and I left school, you know, going up in 11th grade to go out with a touring band, you know, as making 250 bucks a week and all my friends were schlepping away in school. And I was like, man, I want to play rock and roll. Get chicks and drink and I'm doing what do you know? Yeah, that point did you when you're 21 and you join quiet Riot the national bands a big band? Did you just feel like you won the lottery at that point? Well, yes, and you know what in here was the deal. I was I was if I got any green or you could smoke me man. I knew nothing about the business. Yeah, of rock and roll. I was just so happy to be in LA and being one of the bands that you know, I idolized and it was really a dream come true. Looking back I you know, I would have done some things differently. Just business wise. I didn't know any. I was just happy to be there. You know. I heard I never learned all that business stuff, you know, that you learn as you. What would you have done differently business wise? I think I would have gotten involved in probably the writing a lot more. Yeah. probably gotten an attorney. You know, really? Yeah. It's interesting. There's a kid here that I interviewed. Uh, I mean, he's like, I'm thinking, I think he might be 21 now, but he's real, super young. And he's got a music career. He's really talented. And, yeah, he's telling me he's got, you know, an attorney and a manager and agent on like, all these things. And I'm like, wow, this is I mean, cuz but that's what you got to do now, huh? That's a big piece of it. You had to do that back then, too. I just didn't know. You know, and. But, you know, at the same time, I, that's kind of been my wife. I've learned everything the hard way. And, you know, I'm just kind of one of those knuckleheads that has to learn it the hard way and then I learned it. Yeah. I'm good. So I wouldn't change a thing you know and,

Sean McNabb :

...and going back to Frankie Banilli...God rest his soul. He gave me my start in the business. If it wasn't for Frankie, I wouldn't have leapfrogged to all those bands that I've been in and had that kind of music career and hey, we made albums. There's a lot of people that can't say that- that made records.

Chuck Shute :

Do you have a memory of Frankie that like something that stands out when you think back at that time? Yeah, he was really good to me. Especially in the beginning, he'd always take me out to dinner and I'll never forget us playing Japan Aid 2 together it was it was my first big gig. And here was the bill- dig this bill- It was Dio, Quiet Riot, George Duke, Irene Cara. Gorky Park, oh and James Brown. Oh, wow. That's a diverse mix of artists. So I got to meet James Brown and hang out with all those other guys. But that was my first big gig. Really cool. And Frankie was just such a powerhouse, man, he just laid that groove down and you just jumped right in it. And he taught me a lot about how to play in the pocket. I learned a lot from him. And I did a lot of things that... stupid stuff kids do when they're kids, and he checked me on a lot of that. And I was I was thankful for it, because I needed to be checked at that time. Right? Just like partying too hard or something or like that? Maybe a little bit of that, but just things that kids do. Not always the best decisions. Okay. All right. Fair enough. We'll so yeah, you made that one album with them in 88 or, or because around that time and then you got your choice so many bands it's made looking at your resume and people's just go on your Wikipedia but you're in the House of Lords for an album. And then a nightlight. Yeah. Yeah. And you made it you made an album called a bad boys with a with a Z. I don't know if I if I heard that one. But I mean, and then another one called Bad Moon Rising. I think it was around this time, right?

Unknown Speaker :

Yeah, that was what cow

Chuck Shute :

and Doug Doug orders and cow Swan from Lyon. And I didn't actually do the record. I did the tour. Chuck right. Did the did the record. But that Doug, Doug actually got me that gig in House of Lords as well Doug Aldridge and Okay, we we go back a long ways, you know, and he's a wonderful guitar player and great guy. But yeah, that's really got me off and running there. Yeah, though, and I found this interesting too, because there's always kind of this discussion about the arena rock bands versus the grunge bands or whatever. But you were actually friends with the bassist, good friends of the bassist from Alice in Chains- Mike Starr. In fact, he used your bass on the "Dirt" record, which is pretty crazy. That is absolutely true. And

Sean McNabb :

got I'll show it to you. It's right here.

Chuck Shute :

Oh, wow.

Sean McNabb :

Yeah,

Chuck Shute :

Exciting.

Sean McNabb :

This is actually really cool.

Chuck Shute :

What brand is that? This is an old Specter. Okay.

Sean McNabb :

And actually, really cool. Every major record that I've done, almost every record that I've done in my career has been with this bass and they This is one of the original specters that was made in the late 70s This is number 385. But it's just a recording machine, man. It's beautiful. And Mike Starr also played the specters and.. he liked this bass, he had played it before.

Chuck Shute :

And I said, Hey, you want to? You want me to bring it down and you can plug it in and see what it's like. And I did... and I love that Mike Starr man, he was a great dude. At the time, we were all into that band Iinfectious Grooves which was Robert Trujillo, we'd fuck around with the thumb a lot in those days, and that had nothing to do with Alice In Chains... But Mike was into it, too... And so he goes, Hey, can you show me some of that stuff? And, I did and I'll never forget this. We're one on one. And they're doing the record. And I think Dave Jerden, Mike and I go into the bass room and you know, we're fucking around with the basses and, and he goes, "can show me some of that slap stuff?', and I go, okay... sure. And so we started messing around with the amps. And we are just slapping away and they're having fun.. just what bass players do. Yeah, especially at the time. And Jared, Dave jerden walks in and goes, did you guys did you guys change the EQ on the amps? You idiots! Fucking yelled at us.... So we're like, whoops. Was he was producer or engineer?

Sean McNabb :

Producer, because it was set for the album... Oh, we could have known better you, kid. Yeah, we're having fun... And anyway, yelled at us and with with good reason. And, I look back at that and we lost Mike and who knows what could have happened that I might ended up in the band had that gone differently, but whatever

Chuck Shute :

In Alice In Chains?

Sean McNabb :

Yeah,

Chuck Shute :

Did you try out for them or something? No, but I was friends with those guys. You were friends with all of Alice In Chains?

Sean McNabb :

What's that?

Chuck Shute :

You were friends with all the guys in Alice in Chains?

Sean McNabb :

Yeah.

Chuck Shute :

Oh, I didn't know that.

Sean McNabb :

But Mike... we knew each other. And so anyway, it was one of those things that...he was a special guy and just had a heart of gold. And that brings me to... I got so many friends that are not here anymore. And... I, I got sober 16 years ago. And, you know, I got tired of seeing my friends. Move on.... and that's been painful....

Chuck Shute :

I've heard that story from a lot of people I've interviewed like, I think one of the first was a was Craig gas. He was like good friends with a comedian Mitch Hedberg and that guy, and there was like, just so many like, it was the same thing. All these friends he got so tired of it. And he told me he just quit cold turkey one time he just you had a beer and he just goes, he threw it away. And he's like, I haven't had a drink since crazy. I love Greg to man. Oh, you know? Yeah, yeah. I love him on those roasts, man. Yeah, like, Yes, he's the man those roast. Yeah. But anyway, I met him a little while back but I didn't know he was sober But yeah, I didn't do it cold turkey. But it's it's been one of the best things that I ever did you know? Yeah. So back but going back to your cursor in the 90s. Eventually you join a great way and you're in that band for like, nine or 10 years or something you're on like five albums. Jeff needs from Damien keys and night Ranger produce that can't get there. From here. record which was actually like a really good record. It had a lease a song or two I think on rock radio. And I remember living in Seattle and I loved hard rock, and I like grunge too but they would never play like the quote unquote hairbands like new music and they played that song a lot and Seattle rock radio and I was like, wow, they're playing the new Great White. This is amazing. It was a really good song. The Rolling Stone song. Yeah. You said some of the greatest times of your life, but also some of the darkest times with great white. Absolutely. Yeah, I am really proud of the music that we made and especially now they can't get there. From here record. I did five albums with them. But that that one was on john colliders label. And like Aerosmith and stuff, right, Isn't he the guy in the Aerosmith videos with a beard? Like dude looks like a lady. That's him. He looks like john lennon kinda. Yeah, with a big wire. Yeah, yeah, exactly. Yes, yeah, we were on his label. And we worked really hard on that record. And it was interesting because Don dokin started out producing it. Right and we just couldn't get anything done. You know, and it wasn't Dawn's fault it just for some reason or another, we just couldn't get anything done and jack blades got hired to come in, and boy, we knocked that record out in a month's time. And I was like, thinking, wow, this is either gonna be really great. Or it's really gonna suck being produced by a bass player or, you know, he's gonna want to play the bass or something. He was the greatest producer. He was supportive. He knew how to get the stuff the best out of you. He wrote great songs. Did he co write some songs on out because he's co written songs with a not only Night Ranger and Damn Yankees but also for Vince Neil and Aerosmith and I mean, he's all over the place. He's a great writer, and a great and he just brought it all together man we knocked that record out in a month's time and kept it we kept it I want to say not so slickly produced it had a rawness about it. Mm hmm. Women in verb like all that ad stuff is in the news that he he told you guys to listen to the Rolling Stones for like 30 days straight before he went into the studio and recorded it. And it was longer than that. I went out and just bought the stones collection. Okay, and just enough and I already love Bill Wyman. So that was an easy one for me. Yeah, no. And, and he was right. You know that that record has that vibe to it? Yes. And he was man, one of the best producers I've ever worked with. So you said one of the high points of Great White was you did a tour with Ratt, Poison and LA Guns. That sounds pretty that sounds like one of my dream tours for sure to watch. Dude, we we had such a ball on that that was in 99. And Poison hadn't toured in 10 years. So Oh, okay.

Sean McNabb :

So you throw Ratt onto the bill, Great White and LA guns. And it was sold out every night, man, every amphitheatre that we played throughout the country was sold out. And wow, it was just, it was one of those special tours that I'll never forget. It was just awesome and Poison couldn't have treated us better. And then you got Ratt on the bill. It was it was really it was a really special thing and people came out for it and supported it. And we had a record out to to work. We were kind of like you said some radio. Yeah. So we met them. Jack, and I love Jack. At that time Jack was at the top of his game man top of his game. And when jack is at the top of his game, nobody can touch.

Chuck Shute :

Yeah, no, that must have been a fun tour. So you you are still kind of in party mode at this point you hadn't kind of clean up your act so what about those other bands though? Because they're some of those guys are a little bit older at this point, I think hadn't Poison kind of clean up at that point? They were kind of they were sober and stuff or Shenanigans? Some of the were... but there was a lot of shenanigans and all that rock star stuff... Give me one story like from like an average Joe like me, like, What's something that people would hear and be like, Oh my god, like, I mean, you've seen like the movie rock star. I'm sure you've seen Motley Crue's "The Dirt." Does that like is there anything on close to that level that's happening on this tour. Absolutely. And more. And more?

Sean McNabb :

I don't want to go into detail. But it was all going on in that tour. We had a ton of fun. Of course, nobody was getting hurt or anything but yeah... that was all that decadence and rock and roll and people having a good time. It was a summer tour, you know?

Chuck Shute :

Yeah.

Sean McNabb :

Not a lot of clothing. You know.

Chuck Shute :

We had so much fun. I'll never forget this... We had this bottle rocket fight one night.

Sean McNabb :

... Three of the buses, I think it was might have been Fourth of July or something like that. Okay, but three of the buses were on one side of the back parking lot of the amphitheater, and three or four of the buses were on the other side. And I'll never forget this. Some guy was in Florida or something this guy shows up. He had a suitcase full of mushrooms...

Chuck Shute :

Like Psychadellic mushrooms? Yeah. And we all you know, thank God it was after the gig or it was always after the gig? Is that pretty common with rock bands do most of them not do anything while they're on stage? Because I feel like Guns n' Roses. there's times where I've watched them and gone, like back in the day where they were like, just beyond fucked up. Oh, yeah, I can't speak for everybody else. I think it everybody differs and everything. Okay,

Sean McNabb :

For me, I always wanted to do a good show and then get my party on. Okay. Yeah, but, I think for some people, whatever works, but that is a drag, though, when you go to a show and the band's too wasted to give you a good game,

Chuck Shute :

right? Exactly. Yeah, that sucks. But anyway, so this guy had a suitcase full of mushrooms and bottle rockets and what? Oh, yeah. So we all bought these fireworks, you know, because they were legal on everything or whatever and We all took the mushrooms and we know we're coming on the mushrooms. And somebody runs out of the bus with like some bottle rockets and fires them in our bus and we're like, oh, no, you're not getting away with that. So we run out and fire some bottle rockets.

Sean McNabb :

Next thing you know, it's Roman candles.

Chuck Shute :

Oh my God!

Sean McNabb :

Looks like a fire fight.

Chuck Shute :

Nobody got hurt?

Sean McNabb :

No.... A miracle. We're running out and next thing you know, we're chucking M-80s.. Okay, whatever we had.... It was great.

Chuck Shute :

We were right. We weren't throwing the M-80s too far. We just throw them out in the middle of the parking lot to blow up and scare somebody. You know. It was just boys having fun. And that was that was a great night. I'll never forget that. And you know, it was the psychedelics too. And well, that's right you're on mushrooms while you're watching this... that must have been freaking you out a little?

Sean McNabb :

Nah... it was great. They enchanced the experience.

Chuck Shute :

Okay.So those are some of the good times. But then like you said, you also said, these were some of the darkest points for you. So this is kind of when you hit your, your low point with addiction. I know great white the band, obviously, there were some bad things for them. And this is interesting. I heard you talk about this, because you were actually not there for the whole Station Nightclub Rire. But you said that somebody asked you about that incident. Like, every single time you brought up the band name and here I am completing the cycle here. And that started to kind of wear on you, right? It really did.

Sean McNabb :

You know, my addiction, you know, from there kept kind of ramping up and you know, that the cocaine and the alcohol and all that, you know, really ramped up for me and it started to get out of here. Control. And I had got in. Let's see, I got fired from the band towards the end of addiction... and that was not easy because, I've been in the band for a long time. Yeah. And that didn't help. But then they had asked me, someone from management company called up and said, Hey, you want to go out and do this tour? And here's what we can pay you. And I'm like, wait a minute, I used to be a member of this band and a member of the corporation. That's what you're going to offer me to go back out? No, thanks. I'm not going to do it. And two and a half weeks later, that happens.

Chuck Shute :

Wow.

Sean McNabb :

So I think somebody was looking out for me. Yeah. And it was such a horrible tragedy that happened that we're shouldn't have happened and of course nobody went there to hurt anybody just set of circumstances that kind of was it.

Chuck Shute :

So was it common to use pyrotechnic pyrotechnics in small clubs back then? Because I don't know now they've made it illegal to do so. But is that something that they'd done a lot or

Sean McNabb :

We never did you know, okay never did. And I had played that club many times. And there was a lot of foam on the walls for sound because the neighbors bigger stuff about town. And I guess the adhesive that they had stuck all that onwards was highly flammable. Oh, that's what was the deal with that but like you said.. I almost I, I kind of took Great White off my resume for a long time because every time that would come up, someone would ask me about the tragedy in the fire and I just felt so bad about it... I lost friends there. And I kind of had to just let that go and horrible tragedy...

Chuck Shute :

Yeah terrible so and then you kind of close the book on great wine in about 2008 and then you started you joined dokin for I think you did a couple albums with them and you called dawn doc and I mean, he kind of produced that one album for gray or started to but you called him your your boss, which is kind of interesting. So what's it like having Don dokken as a boss? Is he a cool boss? Yeah, dun dun was great, you know, and we had some really good years with him and, and then, you know, he had some rough years with the health stuff and he struggled with his voice a little bit. You know, I heard he had surgery on his hand or something and it didn't go well. Didn't. Was it is I don't know. Okay, but I knows that he's a near and dear friend of mine and Door the man and I, I want good health and you know his girls a friend of mine too. And I want good health for him. And last time I saw him he looked good. He sounded good. No, it made me very happy now that we, we, we we played a lot of gigs together, you know, and Mick brown and john Levin and we have solid thing going there for many years and made some good music as well. Yeah, it's interesting because so you were in Dokken and you worked with Don Dokken but then you also would later end up joining Lynch Mob so you work with the original Dokken guitarist George Lynch of course.. What's he like to work with? He kind of intimidates me. I've heard stories where not he might come off to some people is, I don't know. Just like he scares me a little bit like he might have like, people think he has an attitude or something or did you have any experience with him? Well, I had worked with George back in 2000. Wasn't too I did a summer with Lynch Mob so I go way back. This whole Dokken lineage I go back with.. Wow.

Sean McNabb :

Since Under Lock and Key and everything and that whole.. Great White and Dokken used to have rehearsal studios right across from each other down the beach. So, you know, we were always around each other

Chuck Shute :

okay.

Sean McNabb :

And yes... George is... he's one of the guys that is in that top five. He's right in there with in the conversation with Eddie Van Halen. Randy Rhoads. George Lynch. I mean, he's in there.... he's one of those Zakk Wylde. He's in that conversation for Guitar Hero, very special player. He's kind of like nobody can really do what he does.

Chuck Shute :

Yeah.

Sean McNabb :

Got his own thing?

Chuck Shute :

Mm hmm.

Sean McNabb :

And yeah, it was really cool to play with him for many years. And he's one of those guys - either you get him or you don't. Sometimes his humor can be taken the wrong way. If you get it, you get it. And if you don't you don't. That's just what it is with him and I'm proud of the work and the the eight year run that I did with him. And I felt like I've been blessed to lay it down for a lot of those Guitar Hero guys, Ronnie Montrose, George Lynch, Doug Aldridge. It's a big responsibility to, to lay it down for these guitar heroes. And it's my job is to make everybody look good. When I say that, I mean, lay down that foundation so everybody can shine

Chuck Shute :

You don't mind kind of taking that little bit of a backseat with a lot of the stuff in the band. I mean, because you started to be in the band and play but you're not the front man.

Sean McNabb :

Exactly.Yeah. Yeah. Good with that. And, you know, I've, I've made a career out of it, you know, and been really lucky. I'm still doing it. Yeah. And, yeah,

Chuck Shute :

yeah, so I was gonna ask you another thing too. Is it true that you I don't know if you wrote this music or you just play on the music, but you've done like some other stuff besides being in these bands? like McDonald's commercial? I'm loving it is that you plan on that? Or you write that or what was the story with that? I write that wish I wrote it. But uh, no, I was in a series of commercials that you know, about. Whatever. You know, I did some of those and play the bass on that. No, I don't think all of them It's okay. Okay, that's pretty cool, though. And the Dr. Phil. Oh, you did music for that one, too. Yeah, good stuff. For that, and that was a thing that played every day on his show. Oh, so you get a royalty for that then? I did not. I, I took a buyout on the session, you know? Because that's what the offer was. And, you know, I just did it. And did you know is gonna be for Dr. Phil? Or did they just say, well, we need to just do some music and we might use it we might not or how does that stuff work? They tell you like this is the Dr. Phil show you so don't screw it up. I think I know it was for the Dr. Phil show. But was that that was the gig. You know, it was either we can pay you this for the session either if you want to do it or not. And I said yes. They go there. You know, this is a something you're not going to make residuals on. This is where the pays and do you want to do the session? I said, Yeah. Because they have the negotiating power, because if you don't do it, they can just get another bass player, right.

Unknown Speaker :

Sure. Yeah.

Chuck Shute :

Yeah. Because people probably love it. Job. It was something to put on my resume and I thought, Hey, you know, maybe it'll lead to another show or something. When you say resume Do you have like an actual like paper resume? Like for the music stuff? Yeah.

Unknown Speaker :

No.

Chuck Shute :

Yeah, now all the gigs I've gotten have been word of mouth or you know, somebody recommended me or saw me play something you're not so you're not on LinkedIn is what you're telling me? I am but anybody? Has anybody ever got a gig off LinkedIn? I mean, that's what I'm I'm curious for music. I mean, for me, I get offers for like, you know, stupid stuff like, oh, like a sales job or something. I'm like, I don't want to do this. But that'd be interesting if you know. Quiet writer dokin was you know, hitting people up on LinkedIn, I'd be interesting. The world changing. What's Okay, so yeah, I mean that you've done so much music stuff, but let's talk about your acting like What made you want to get into acting because you didn't really do any music and or sorry film and TV work until today was was four Christmases was that was that your first like, major thing that you've done with film and TV or have you done commercials and things? I had? It was one of them. I was already union at that point. Oh, I had stuff. Um, no, I think I got I started doing some commercials and, you know, that's usually that what you start out doing when you're when you're trying to build a resumes you do student films. Come on, you try to do commercial stuff, and you're trying to get your sag card. Okay. I don't know if it's this way anymore, but used to get vouchers for doing those things. And once you have three vouchers, you were eligible to join SAP. Hmm, okay. I'll never forget it. I did. I did a couple of Commercial things and then one afternoon I I played this life coach and something I don't remember exactly but I got Taft Hartley which all what that meant was is i was i was available to be to join the union okay and what you know I spent all this time trying to get the vouchers and then oh you we just chopped Hartley do your in all you got to do is pay the money. Okay? No so yeah so that way you got a union card and then you did you did four Christmases Did you have any interactions with a Reese Witherspoon at all and I really like to get her on my podcasts I'm sure she's probably got a lot of offers. But did you have Do you have interactions with her Vince Vaughn or Yeah, oh, he did. He was amazing. And very nice. She loved music. That was a great shoot. And we this was really cool because we were dwight yoakam is banned in the mo and the church thing Yeah, but there's this whole other huge monologue that he had and, and we, we went into some things with him. So we spent a whole week on the set with him shooting all this, and they ended up cutting that monologue from the movie. But we hung with him and played Beatle songs, you know, all week. It was so much fun. And, dude, that's crazy, because, you know, we were just the band basically in the movie, but because I was union, I got I got paid a SAG rate, and I've probably made I don't know $65,000 off that being in that movie. Really? Wow, I still get still get checks. They're not as big as they used to be. But uh, I still get checks for mad because it's a Christmas movie they play every year. Oh, those are the kind of The kind of gigs that you want now. You get a rent you get a nice guest star or you know lead in one of those movies you are you're making some nice checks, so that's awesome. I like that movie. It's a guilty pleasure for me. I don't know what what it is I just I was my girlfriend was joking. We're like, we want to do that, like at the beginning how they just, they're going to go on vacation for Christmas. Instead of going to their family. We always just like, let's go do that just go on vacation for Christmas. But of course in the movie, they actually end up going to their family. So Vince Vaughn Robert Duvall, yes. I mean, come on. JOHN. nobrow. Like so many. It's such a great cast, right. Yeah. In fabros. I'm a big director, you know, yeah, that was all that. Yeah. I loved him and swingers. That's one of my favorites. Oh, yeah. We were just talking about that the other night. So my guys from acting class were talking about that, and swingers and it was rounders or something to lose swinger. Yeah, yeah. So yeah, so Then you win. Sons of Anarchy, you said that it took like four years to get on the show and you had a little bit of a smaller part, but you did five episodes. So what's it like being on that set? Because, I mean, how many of the guys on that show are actually tough biker guys and how many people are just playing the part because you are a real biker. I saw you went out and rode bikes with gilby Clarke the other day. Yeah, blue spider which if you google the booth spiders, it's a motorcycle clubs been around since 1946. With a lot of the history of Southern California biker culture came from the boosts riders Wait, wait, you call it a club or is it a gang? Is there a difference? It's a club. Okay, a three piece patch. It's the real deal. You know, obviously we're not doing any gangster stuff. That's, that's good. Yeah. We're respected by some of the power clubs because we were around before them and no so the club has that respect. And anyway, it's a really great thing to be a part of. But going back to what you were talking about, it did take me many years to get on the show. It was I was in a lot more than five episodes five oh, that's on my. Yeah, okay. I was in maybe 16 or 17. But anyway, I as an as an actor, you don't want that many a not lead or not co stars or lead roles on your IMDb so I was fine with that. Okay, you don't want uncredited things. Ah, but it was such a great show was written so, so well. And the the eight actors that, you know, the main cast were just some of the best actors that are around and just Everything on that show, the writing the acting, the producing the sets, and my friend, build a lot of those sets. And that show was something very, very special. And I learned a lot, you know, being around that, you know, just watching them. Machine work. Yeah, for sure. Cuz that's a hit show you want to learn and you said, you get recognized more from that show than being in all these bands that you've been in?

Unknown Speaker :

Ah, it depends on

Chuck Shute :

who you ask, you know, starting to get recognized for I'm, I'm obviously much more proud of some of the roles that I've done of late and where I'm playing costars or, you know, bigger parts. Like some of the lifetime movies or this scattered movie that I was just in. Yeah, I want to see that. That looks pretty cool. And then you did a movie called rock story that has an interesting cast Eric Roberts, Joyce DeWitt, who is Janice from Three's Company. Gilbert Godfrey and then you got to do solo music on the record. So you got to sing and I listened to that's you singing right and like in like also your America song. That's you, right? Yeah, I had America another song called fresh air that they asked me to write a couple songs for the movie. And the voice man. I was really impressed. I was like, Oh, I didn't know what to expect for a bass player. But no, you got a really good voice. Thanks. I don't actually, you know, gotten a lot of the gigs that I've gotten because I could sing to you know, you need backing vocals was a real honor to write a couple of songs for that. I've done three movies with Eric Roberts now. And another thing that, you know, we're trying to get off the ground, but he's fabulous. And, you know, rather right. Isn't that right, or is that just a urban legend? No, he is. Yeah. Okay. That's cool. He's done a ton of movies. Oh my god. You're seeing the Pope of Greenwich Village. Hi, nice. I don't think so. Is it good? Check?

Sean McNabb :

Yeah,

Chuck Shute :

this he was here no runaway train seen that one to notch. Yeah, but he's got to be a mile long. Oh yeah for sure. Is that a pretty good gig to be in the in the you know the lessor not not necessarily be movies I know what you call it but he's in so many is that still pretty good gig even if it's not a huge major Hollywood production to do a lot of indie films?

Unknown Speaker :

Yeah.

Chuck Shute :

Yeah, I think I think as actors you know we want to we want to do our craft at all cost, you know, and I know he gets a lot of straight offers because he's Eric Roberts, you know, and myself I I've been working really hard. I work out at a acting studio every week. You know, I've got a coach. I've got a manager here and really working hard to really up my game there and online. to do is be a working actor, you know, I, when we start, I just want to work and do my craft because it's another creative outlet. It's a lot like music, you know, I mean, all that life experience that I've had, I can use in my acting and all that experience being on stage. And I can bring that to these characters. And I'm, I've been learning how to bring them to life with a lot more layers and a lot more depth in the last several years, and I think it's leading to better parts for me as an actor. That's super cool. So you did a lot of pilots you You didn't it didn't make it but what are some of the memorable ones either like really good pilots, or really bad pilots are ones with like star power that didn't end up making it? Well, a lot of pilots are like that, you know? They

Unknown Speaker :

maybe

Chuck Shute :

I think the the staggering numbers are maybe nine eight to nine out of 10 don't make it. Okay, you know, you get every once in a while you get a diamond, you know, it makes it so you say thank God I haven't quite had that one yesterday, you know we remain hopeful and, and open to whatever the universe wants but that happens a lot. And you always put your best foot forward I like I just shot a proof of concept a couple of weeks ago is great thing called Captain 80s about a band that didn't make it into the 80s. And now they get a chance to open up for the huge band in their 50s so the comedy is all and getting the band back together and and I play like the band leader and my daughter's the manager and it leads to these beautiful comic situations and it's a really, really great story. Oh, that sounds fun. right up my alley. Yeah, and, you know, that's I can't say too much about it, but okay, it's gonna be really cool. I saw some some of the dailies last week and it's got a little supernatural thing going on. Really? So how many auditions do you have to do to get apart? Like is it does it take Do you do a lot of auditions? That's what I hear a lot of my acting people that I've interviewed, they said, you know, they just got to go on so many auditions it gets really tiresome. You do a lot of auditions and you hear no a lot. You know, you weren't what they were looking for. Or you know, and then every once in a while, you get you, you're right for it, you know, and it it does help to have people that believe in you and know that you can do it. Sometimes you get straight offers and you don't have to audition but for the most part, and now, a lot of the auditions are like this. No Sure. On these zooms Are you Turn in tapes, you know, and I've been doing that a lot. Everything's been stalled for the last six months, obviously, you know, right as a COVID. And things are, I've had a few turned in a few tapes and things like that. But now, the business is starting to come back, you know, people are hungry for new content. And I know that some shows are ramping up right now in pre production and fewer already in production. So that's a good thing. Okay, not only for, for all the crews, you know, it creates a lot of jobs, you know, in the economy in many different ways. People need entertainment, we need some that we're getting sick of the politics. We need some new shows to take our mind off of that. And there's so many great networks and you know, a lot of outlets for new content. So we're witnessing a really great time for film and TV. Oh, yeah, for sure. It's the Golden Age. So you said earlier, you're 16 years sober now. Why do you think it's such a cliche for so many people to go through this? Like I said, so many people I talk to, you know, they're either the most a lot of them are, you know, they've had success and they've kind of, they go through that phase where they have a party phase, and then they're like, I can't do it anymore. You know, they get too old. Why is that? Like, such a cliche for rock stars and stuff? It just kind of goes along with it. You know, my brother and I, we grew up, you know, idolizing all these rock stars that made it look cool to be fucked up. And, you know, and rock stars, you know, that's, we, we grew up in that era to where, you know, we looked up to all the, all those, you know, Jim Morrison's, and Hendrix's and Janis Joplin's and you know that that looked fun and appealing, you know, and, and, you know, that guy that got me started my brother, he turned out okay, you never had problems, but at the gene, you know, to where, you know, I started using marijuana at a really young age and that led to everything you know, and, and it just, it kind of just goes along with the lifestyle I think, you know, for a lot of people, so when it was around age 39 Did you just get kind of like just felt like got fed up with it to a point where you're just like, I gotta quit? Is that what it was? Or one thing that happened at that point? That was when you're in Great White, I think right? So yeah, there was a, I got tired of looking in the mirror, you know, and going, I don't even know who that guy is. I had a daughter that wanted nothing to do with me, you know, that hurt an awful lot. And I go, you know, I'm 39 years old that I need to, I need to make a change and, and it took a lot of work, but I've got beautiful daughter in my life. I've got a grandkid in my life. You know, that is all the blessing of me getting sober

Unknown Speaker :

and wow.

Chuck Shute :

And it was so much more than drinking in us and you know I don't want to be that preachy a guy but it was like, all that step work and everything I did uncovered a lot of stuff. You know, that made me go oh, you know, it's not just the drinking and using it was a bunch of other stuff that happened in my childhood and this and that that got uncovered and discovered and discarded and and made a lot of sense. So wasn't just a just about the drugs and the alcohol was about just kind of growing up and learning how to do life you know, Okay, wow. So and then you know, you're more Are you more into like health now and stuff because if you're in that party lifestyle, you're probably not worried so much about your health. But now you you know, you I heard you talk I don't if you're still doing this, but you're doing like this diet that you're on like a sugar D detox and you said you'd rather Go to bed hungry and wake up skinny then. And I mean, you look like I'm a shape. So I mean, do you have any diet or fitness tips or anything or what what are you doing now? To stay in shape? Well, it all right, right now, you know, we haven't been able to go to the gym so we're hiking, doing weights in the backyard, you know, but for the most part when you get in your 50s you can't eat all that good stuff that we used to eat, you know, you really got to cut the sugar out or just packs the pounds. At least it does meet.

Unknown Speaker :

Yeah, so I found

Chuck Shute :

out I'm on a keto based diet. Okay, that isn't always fun. But you know, you reward yourself here and there, you know, and you can eat all that stuff. I always my wife and I we always joke. We're like, we're Christian Bale eat that. Answer is Oh, no. No and especially if he's doing that one movie where he's all like skinny and he's like really? Crazy. Yeah, he's an he is an insanely good actor. One of the best probably the best. Yeah, I can't anyone better so how are you? Oh, my wife is also in the entertainment business she's a news anchor in LA yeah yeah. She's movies to write the Cable Guy and stuff like that. Oh she's she's played that news anchor you know a lot but she's she's also you know, in the business. So we we check each other Hey, your talent issue, Gabby. We're getting whatever, juicy fruits so how do you go? You're able to be a part of so many great bands and do all this TV and film work to like how do you keep getting all these gigs? Like is it you like knocking down the door a lot, or people are people coming to you based on your reputation. Like what's the secret to your success is never give up. keep improving remain teachable. Like I said, you hear no a lot, you know, and I think with the acting thing if you're doing it all the time, like, Here, look at this table. Oh, wow script. Yeah. Yeah, we're scenes, okay, you know, if you're doing it all the time, it becomes second nature and, you know, you learn how to break these scenes down you learn how that people think being an actor is memorizing your lines and saying your lines, dude, that's like that much of it. You know, there's so much more that goes into it. And the people that are booking the roles are those people that are uncovering every stone and, and are crossing those T's and dotting the eyes and Having a moment before knowing their story arc and knowing the character arc and, and knowing how to deliver beats and things, it's just, it's this whole other craft, you know, is there is there an actor or director or like a TV series like that you really would like to work with or TV series they want to be on. Um, there's so much good TV out there right now. I, you know, really, I can't say one in particular, I just, I want to work with writers that are just all in, you know, and that are creating these characters that have that are layered characters, which, for the most part, they all are at that level, they're there. They're amazing. And yeah, I kind of gravitate towards the darker layered characters. I like that. I like comedy too. But I like those darker characters. That, I find that fun. Okay. And I'm reading a great script right now which the director from the scanner movie co wrote, and it's just so badass. And we'll see, you know, we just, we keep on. Yeah. What about bands? Is there a band you've played in so many bands? Is there a band that you haven't played with that you want to play with? Absolutely. You know, I still want to I want to play with all those classic guys like Peter Frampton and Fogarty. And, you know, I'm, it's, I'm more into that classic thing anyway. Huh? Ah, so, I would like to play with, you know, those kind of guys. That's it because Rudy sarzo he's in the guest who now? It sure is. And let me say I love Rudy sarzo. You know so much. He's, he's a he's been a mentor for me. He's been a friend. He's been somebody that I looked up to Just idolized that became my friend, you know, and that that's a that's a beautiful blessing in itself, you know, and it's taught me just how to carry myself, you know, the way you carry them. Yeah. So what's more fun music or acting? Oh, they're both equally rewarding. No, they're different. But the same. Yeah. There's nothing like playing a big old gig and you've got the crowd on your side. And people notice songs and they come up to you afterwards and go cat. Oh my god, I got married to that song. You have no idea. You know, I used to have people say that to me. And that's pretty neat that you can affect people like that. It's very cool. And it's also cool when somebody comes up and goes, man, I love so and so you agreed in that? You so you've done so many music projects and movie TV things? And like you said, you know, you've there's so many great things that you've done, but have you ever do you ever hear a demo or you look Got a script and you just think this is a pile of shit. But then like you need the money so you do it anyways, are you enough? Are you at the point now where you're you can be selective and say no, I'm not interested in that. I've definitely done that. If the writings not up to par, or whatever I be, you know, the first guy to go, Hey, it's great wish you guys the best with it, you know, and I've got enough footage and credits now to where if it's not up to par, I will say, hey, wish you the best one you project. But you know, this one's not a that's cool. Or I would do that. Now. Yeah, you're and an agent or is it the same guy or is it two different people? I do. Actually, my manager is behind that show Cobra Kai, which is huge right now. Oh, I fucking love that show. It's funny because I watched him when I was on YouTube. And I was trying to tell everybody about it. But nobody had YouTube read. So everyone's like, Yeah, whatever. And now it's on Netflix. And now it's blowing up and I'm like, I told you this three years ago, whatever. I know he's gonna kick my ass because I haven't watched it yet. But I know, naughty kid. I of course I saw that. Okay, if you like the original first Karate Kid movie, you'll love Cobra Kai. Okay. Yeah. And I think it's a nice go. Like, think about how many guys shows out there. There's not very many guy shows. This is a guy show. It's really cool. Yeah. So I'm thrilled for them. And I've also got an agent in New Mexico, which is a hotbed hotbed for TV and film as well. And I'm praying for New Mexico to get up and running because that's, uh, you know, a lot of my friends work in that industry down there, and I'm praying for them to get back to work. Yeah, that's very cool. So who has your egos musicians like rock stars or movie stars? You know, here's the deal with egos. In my opinion is the people that have been around a long time, usually don't have egos, because they're so thankful for what they have and what they've achieved, and that they're still doing it. Those are the people that are usually really cool. That's why I do these interviews everyone I've talked to has been like, so nice to me. Like I'm like, Okay, this guy. I mean, like, you think they could be a dick if they want it, they can be a total asshole to me, but they're not. And it's like, kind of like surprising, because you always think this, that these rockstars have these big egos, and they're prima donnas. And I just don't see any of that. And, you know, maybe they turn it on for the turn it off for the interviews. But yeah, so you're saying behind the scenes, same thing?

Unknown Speaker :

Well, what I'm

Chuck Shute :

saying is the people that have been around and been in the business a long time, are usually really cool, because that's how you stay in the business a long time is that you're easy to work with. You're cool. You don't have the ego. In my opinion, those are the people that have long the longevity. You know, as I've noticed, you know, when people first get some fame or something, that's when the ego takes over for a little while. People got to go through, got to go through for a little while. And they think they're doo doo doesn't stink or whatever for a little while, and then they come back down in reality go, Wow, I'm just grateful to have a career and be doing this. Right. He's got to go through it. You know, just part of that part of the thing. Hopefully, it doesn't last very long. And you come out the other side quickly. Yeah, no, that's really cool. Well, you mentioned your wife earlier. She's an Emmy Award winning journalist who and she's from Arizona. She went to ASU. And she's, like I said, She's been a bunch of TV shows and movies. How did you guys meet? Was she a fan of your music or? No, no. Yes, she saw my wife is amazing. Dude, she's she got 17 Emmys. She's been on Fox 11 for 30 years. And she has a boardroom at ASU in the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism down there named after her. She's like, she is a rock star. That's awesome. Crazy, and especially here in Southern California. Everybody knows her and loves her. She's doing great work for inner city kids in a program. She goes called Wednesday's child. Yeah, tell me. They've adopted over five or 600,000 or five or 600 inner city kids have been adopted with this program. Yeah. And she she's really doing God's work with that and just to see these kids, you know, get forever homes and you know, it's just so inspiring and the work that she does and these pieces that she puts together and profiles the kid on on the news, You know, it's worked, you know, five between five and 600 kids and it's really a beautiful thing and, and that to her credit that's that's the person she is, you know, it's it's not phony it's heartfelt you know. And it's just inspiring. I don't know anybody that works harder than she does. Wow. Going on stories and stuff that she's producing. Oh, yeah. Yeah, she works till 1230. She gets home at 1230 at night. She's on the meeting at 930 in the morning, setting up for a nother meeting at two. They're on it five. They then they're on at 10 So yeah, that girl works hard. At crazy. It makes you want to work hard to Yeah, no, it sounds like you're pretty busy yourself like you. I mean, all these bands that you're in and are you still doing the movies and TV and the music.. are you in a band right now? Oh, yeah.... I'm in several bands. We just dropped. I'm working. I got a video that just came out with gilby Clarke.

Sean McNabb :

That was really... that's a stripped down version of the album version that we did. And that's like the three piece version, I'm also in this band called "Brown M&Ms," which is a, it's a Van Halen band and, everybody... it's the coolest band. It's Toshi Yanagi from the Jimmy Kimmel band. It's Joe Travers from... he's played with everybody, Zappa to Zappa. Eric Johnson, all these great people. And Eric Dover is the singer.

Chuck Shute :

He was in a Jellyfish Jellyfish, Yeah, and Alice Cooper and Slash and all that stuff. Just killer band. And we were not a tribute band. But we we pay homage to old Van Halen like hey, We do all that Dave area era Van Halen.

Sean McNabb :

And all we're doing is just catching the spirit of what they had back then.

Chuck Shute :

Okay. Wow. You know, Eddie's been sick and we just praying that he's okay. And you know, we're paying homage to that great work that they did. Awesome. Are you going to tour? Are you going to tour with gilby? I have to or McGill. We I play with him when his regular guy can't make it. But we're the best of friends and we got another thing. Getting ready to come out with? It's Kilby Warren demartini. Myself, Jimmy danda.

Unknown Speaker :

Yeah,

Chuck Shute :

that's what we're doing right now. We're doing these live streams or these videos and, and because we

Unknown Speaker :

can't gig.

Chuck Shute :

Yeah. Now that's crazy. And then you have a movie. You have a movie called the locker that's coming out. And then you'll there's another one. I was curious about another one with Eric Roberts called rock and roll zombie apocalypse. I'm really not with half isn't that two? Ooh, Mark Metcalf from an Animal House. There's a bunch of people in that, you know, we haven't actually shot that. The we shot a trailer for that. Okay. And you can you can watch the trailer, but I know they're still trying to. That's one of those pilots. They're still trying to secure the funding to make the feature. Okay. Really great. Well, we just hope that they can get the funding together on that, you know, cool, awesome. Well, thank you so much. Is there anything else you want to promote at this time? Ah, no. You know, I'm, I want you to check out that sts arrivers movie, which is on Amazon. And it's a story of the Leonard Skinner plane crash. I want to see Is it free on President prime? Or do you have to pay for it? I think you've got to pay for it. But it's not much like Yeah. 99 like that. But my good friends at Cleopatra, Brian Pereira and badass director, Jared Cohn, who he's he's becoming like, he's working one movie after another. He's becoming the man. So we're very happy for him. And yeah, check it out. It's okay. Pretty cool. Especially if you don't know the story of the Leonard Skinner plane crash. Skinner, who's one of my favorite all time bands, you know, and that's one of the reasons that I wanted to get involved in that movie. And you know, my friend Brian Pereira, clean pair of Cleopatra records. produced it. Go check it out. I think you'll find it entertaining. Cool. Yeah, support the arts, you know. All right. Well, thank you so much for doing this. I really appreciate it. It was really interesting like to hearing all this stuff like these stories. Chuck, thanks for doing your research. You're really well researched. Oh, yeah. Yeah, no, definitely. Yeah. You're very interesting person. You've done a lot of stuff. So it's cool. I really pay

Sean McNabb :

for a Torah shirt. That's how cool is that?

Chuck Shute :

Yeah, I gotta support my boys because I they took the time to do you know interview with me the singer and the guitar sounds really cool. So yeah. Yeah, you know, we they were on the monsters rock cruise a couple years ago, and I I went and saw him because I always liked him. Yeah, I was. I was a fan, you know? Yes. And so. So having to bro he really liked him too. Oh, it's very cool. Yeah, so check out Larry in the monsters rocker doing a bunch of those live streams and they've been really really good. They sound good look, yeah. Check those out as well. Yeah, hope you can tour to Phoenix. I'd love to shake your hand in person when it's safe. Man, be great to grab a coffee and shoot the shit. Absolutely. Thank you. So much. Okay, john, I appreciate you. It was some links. Let me know where I can follow up. Okay, well, we'll do thank you so much, brother. You too. So that was Sean McNab, musician, actor extraordinaire. Just overall such a nice guy to very cool, easy to chat with. Very easy interview for me a lot of fun. As always, I hope you guys are having fun listening. If you enjoyed the interview, tell a friend or share it on social media and tag me. I think that's kind of cool if you want to do that. If you want to keep up with the interviews, you can follow me on social media, or hit the subscribe button so you don't miss any new episodes. Make sure you follow Sean as well so you can keep up with his amazing career. Until next time, have a great day or night and remember to shoot for the moon.