Chuck Shute Podcast

Cory Marks (country rock artist)

February 01, 2024 Cory Marks Season 5 Episode 409
Chuck Shute Podcast
Cory Marks (country rock artist)
Show Notes Transcript

Cory Marks is a Canadian country rock artist with over 220 million global streams.  He has collaborated with Ivan Moody, Mick Mars, Travis Tritt, Jason Hook, Tyler Connolly & Kevin Churko.  His latest single "A Different Kind of Year" is available now and he is currently on tour in Canada. 

00:00 - Intro
00:13 - New Song & Country Rock Style
00:55 - Renaissance Man
07:53 - Playing Covers Vs. Originals
09:30 - Working with Kevin Churko
14:10 - MIck Mars, Travis Tritt & Ivan Moody
16:50 - Pinch Me Moments & Hurdles
17:55 - Tommy Lee & Retaliators
19:10 - Drum Solos & Style
22:13 - Bryan Adams
25:06 - Canada & Better Noise Music
27:40 - Arizona
28:28 - Outro

Cory Marks website:
http://www.corymarks.com/

Chuck Shute Linktree:
https://linktr.ee/chuck_shute

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Thanks for Listening & Shute for the Moon!

Chuck Shute:

So the new song I love it a different kind of a year. Again, the smiles the crying, happy tears, hugging and chugging the party. You know, it's like that party country that I feel like it's so it's really brought new life to country made me a fan because I never I grew up in the 80s and 90s I felt like country was always so sappy and depressing then, but now it's like more of this like, happy fun country party rock that I love.

Cory Marks:

Yeah, I mean, you know, obviously, I can channel those those sad, sad countries stuff too, you know, and those stories because I mean, that's what life's all about is up and downs. But this one's definitely more of a feel good, upbeat song.

Chuck Shute:

Absolutely. Well, it's interesting too, because like, you have the you're kind of like a renaissance man. Like, you've got the music stuff and you not only sing and write songs, we also play the drums. You've acted a little in the retaliate errs, you played ice hockey, you fly your pilot, like, how was it? I mean, it seems so rare these days for people to be able to do so many different things. Like why do you think you're able to do all those different things and other people struggle with just being good at one thing?

Cory Marks:

I mean, I think I definitely have my parents to thank for that on the music side. And even the hockey side. I mean, it's been so supportive, you know, getting up early at six in the morning and driving us to practice and, you know, making that sacrifice to, you know, it's not cheap either. So and, you know, I didn't I didn't come from money. So we had to work hard for everything that we had. And, you know, just blessed to have a good loving family to support that, whether that was hockey music. I mean, my brother is a 14 year pro hockey player drafted to the NHL and now coaching in the Western Hockey League for the Seattle Thunderbirds. You know, I was doing the drumming thing, and then into hockey and then into flying, got my pilot's license. And then, you know, obviously, throughout, throughout since, whatever it was 2010 or 11, when I started this music career, you know, my dad was actually one of my first drummers, so that was pretty cool, until we started getting too tired going into work. So my mom put an end to that. So we're gonna find drummer. But I think just just having the support from friends and family is probably the main thing. And getting getting that love and support from them. Kind of keeps you going and keeps you humble, too. But

Chuck Shute:

you don't get you see, because I feel like a lot of it is people, kids will get into like video games, or people get into Netflix, it's so easy to get addicted to it. So there's so much good streaming. So when I was a kid, there was like 12 channels. And now there's like so much streaming. I mean, you could literally just watch movies and TV all day. And so many people I think just get caught up in that how did you not get caught up in just being entertained all the time, you actually like want to go out and do things, I

Cory Marks:

mean, has a kid or, or even now, you know, my early 30s It's like, I've always been that way I want to get up and do something I want to mingle with people, I want to make people laugh and feel good and smile and, and that's what I hope my music does, too. But you know, it's always just been that way for me, you know, I'm a bit of a social butterfly and like to get out there and be with people and and most of all, my best friends or anyone on this bus will know that I like to have a good laugh too. I think it's really important for the for the mind, soul and the heart. So I like to try to give that to people as well. You know, when I ever get out and stuff. And I like even when I was younger, if I was playing video games, it was like Grand Theft Auto so I can drive cars and steal planes. Even as a hockey player, I played very little NHL, my brother loved it and his friends would come over. But then once they were done and went outside or something, well then I'd fire up the Ace Combat and fly jets and stuff and do missions like that, because as a kid and even into my early 20s That's what I wanted to do was become a fighter pilot. And so that was kind of a huge goal of mine and still a huge passion of mine as a pilot as a private pilot. So I always like to stay busy and keep the hands and feet and mind. Mind going.

Chuck Shute:

That's awesome. So with the pilot stuff, how do you how does that work? Because, you know, maybe I should get a pilot's license because I absolutely hate flying commercial and I don't think I can afford a private jet. But if you get a private license for flying like do you have to you have to assume you either have to own a plane or what do you have to borrow somebody's or rent one or how does that work? Because those are still expensive, right?

Cory Marks:

It depends what you're flying it depends what you get into and even as a private pilot, you know there's there's certain you know, boxes you got to check off I mean, to kind of get in depth of certain things. I mean, there's you know, you get your private pilot license which is you know, daytime flying VFR visual flight rules. They then you can get into ILS which is instrument sorry not ILS. I have fought her. I'm right and cool. Really cool thing is our buses here. The venue's there and the Victoria airport is literally right here right on the threshold. So we're seeing planes coming in, which is a bonus for me, but Then there's IFR, which is more like a weather like this where the ceiling is quite low. It's, you know, it's an instrument rating, then you get multi engine, night rating, all that kind of stuff in order for you to fly in certain conditions. And then there's your commercial license. So I'm restricted to certain things unless I go again, check those boxes off. But it's, I suggest anyone who has any kind of passion for flight or planes or has ever even thought or dreamt of flying. I, you know, it's never too late. And I think it's always worth it to at least take a look into it. If you get into it and realize, okay, shit, this is maybe not my thing. It's cool. But this is pretty intense than Hey, at least you can say you're trying. But if you end up getting through it and loving it, and being really even more passionate about it, as you learn then hey, man, sky's the limit. Yeah,

Chuck Shute:

well, did you ever think of doing the Canadian Air Force? Is that Is that a thing? Do they have they must have an Air Force? Right? Of

Cory Marks:

course they do. Yeah. And I when I first started this, this music career that was the I was I kind of started playing when there's the bass player. I started Hey, man, Shane. I actually so when I started playing music, that's how it all started. For me. I was. I was I attended the Royal Military College Canada, I was scouted I was actually scouted by Ohio State University to go division one when I was 18. And I was fresh out of high school, and I didn't want to go back to school.

Chuck Shute:

Ohio State football, hockey. Oh, hockey. Okay. Wow.

Cory Marks:

And my only question was, do I have to write that essay T thing? So well, yeah, of course you can. But we'll get you in there. You can write as many times as you want. Like, now, I don't really want to write a test at this point. So I just continued playing hockey. And in my senior years, 20 years old, I there was the Royal Military College of Canada that scouted me to come play for them. And I thought, well, I don't really have anywhere else to go. I had some opportunities, perhaps to play in Europe, as well. And I just didn't really, I wasn't feeling that. So I said, What the hell you know, as a kid, I've always dreamt of being a fighter pilot. So I enrolled as a pilot at the Royal Military College of Canada, and I was on the hockey team, the paladins, in Kingston, Ontario. I was there for several months, and doing some upgrading stuff. And it just kind of fell through the sky wasn't the original plan. And at that time, I started picking up a guitar and singing. And my brother's girlfriend at the time was like, Well, if you don't know what you want to do, why don't you come back home and play at this bar that I'm at, give you a couple 100 bucks every Wednesday. And so that's where it all started, man and one thing led to another it played there Wednesday night, then I'd go to another bar on Thursday started playing Friday, Saturday at this other pub. And then I put a band together as I was saying my dad was one of my first drummers because I couldn't find one. And the rest is history, man. 13 years later, here I am crossing Canada for the seventh time on this big oil rig. And look at that we got a plane taking off right over three now.

Chuck Shute:

That's awesome. What's the when you first started playing the music, I'm assuming was it just covers? Or did you splash in the originals? Or how did you when did you get to start writing your own songs?

Cory Marks:

You know what I've always I've always written my own stuff. Like, I've always been into that. And even before I was ever consider myself a songwriter, I was I was writing and not really even knowing. But I always even at the early days with nothing at radio or, you know, there was MySpace and stuff then, you know, 12 years ago, or whatever it was, and I didn't really have the capability to put the songs out on like, whatever it was Limewire or whatever, right? It wasn't as accessible then but I always always played originals mixed in with covers and even covers I would kind of do my own way I'd do in a different key or different progressions and just kind of do it my own way. And I think it might be because of my drumming background. You know, I hear stuff a little heavier. You know, being a rush fan, like hey, why don't we do this? It's kind of crazy. But I always mix it up originals and and covers, of course.

Chuck Shute:

You so you play covers. Now you you cover any songs I've

Cory Marks:

heard very, very little. I think everybody does, you know, they always throw something that's kind of like, where you come from your roots. And, you know, depending on the crowd, you know, I'll play some Ozzy Osbourne or I'll do some it's funny because I always say this too. You know, if I'm headlining then I'll play both and that's it country music, you know, we love our mamas and rock, you know, they do as well. So the cool thing is, is I might play Mama, Mama Tried by Merle Haggard, and then later on in the setup, I'll also cover Mama Mama, I'm coming home by Ozzy Osbourne. So it kind of goes you know,

Chuck Shute:

hand in hand. Yeah, that's awesome. It didn't you don't you work with the guy with one of the guys that I might remind mixing you did. You didn't even work with one of the guys that worked on the Ozzy album. Kevin.

Cory Marks:

Kevin churko. Yeah, yeah, so he wrote and produced the Black Rain album and I believe it's called I don't want to stop and scream scream that album so scream and the the one I said before that black rain. Yeah, he wrote pretty Have both those albums with Ozzy. So we're very much that's the cool thing about Kevin's also a drummer and a great drummer as well. And that's how we kind of connected was being that being loving country music, songwriting and soul of country music, but the stop and the energy of rock'n'roll. So he got me right away. And that's how we started working together he came to, he came to one of my shows opening up for Toby Keith, and his hometown Moose Jaw. And the rest is history, took a shot at Jack, after the show, shook his hand met him for the first time and said, When can you come to Las Vegas to start writing and recording and outlaws and outsiders was the first song we wrote back in September, I think was late September 2015. And the rest is history. That's

Chuck Shute:

awesome. So what does he bring in terms of a producer and a songwriter? Because the songs are very well produced and very well written. So how much of that is like, Are you writing like most of the song and he's tweaking things? Or is it like, he brings in like a song idea, and you guys work together on it?

Cory Marks:

It's very much a little bit of everything. I mean, okay. I will, like, for example, song called my whiskey or wine, we, we always just kind of hang around the pool, sip on some wine and shoot the shit after, you know, 1012 hours in the studio at his place every day when I'd go down there. And this I just had this kind of Merle Haggard in mind, and I was writing this thing, and I was going through some stuff as well, of course, some heartbreak and I literally just wrote the song, my whiskey or wine in about 20 minutes and sent it to him while he was outside waiting for me with my glass of wine. And he's named, we'll cut that tomorrow. That's great. And, you know, there's stuff like that there's songs that I brought in that I thought were done, but obviously him being the great producer he is, it's like, well, we could do this or do that. Why don't we throw a bridge in here? And then, you know, and then we kind of collab together and do that and he's just so great. I think I just building a song and making it that stomp and amped up, you know, country that you hear on an album like who I am, is a huge, I'm a huge Merle Haggard fan. He's a huge Steve Earle fan. So there's that kind of outlaw badassery going on. And then of course, I'm a huge Well, my favorite record, even in high school was black rain, the Ozzy Osbourne record that I didn't even know at the time, who Kevin churko was, but it was him who ultimately wrote and produced one of my favorite records of all time. So it was kind of ironic how full circle happened. Both drummers both love the hag and Steve Earle. Obviously, big fans of Ozzy, and then we make this this crazy record together. That

Chuck Shute:

is crazy, like synchronicity that, like those are both things that you wouldn't think the guy that made Ozzy, like Merle Haggard, and was on

Cory Marks:

top of that him working with Mark lane on acts like Shanaya Twain. I mean, the the ironic thing is to is Shanaya and well, I played a lot of the same venues and I have played Northern Ontario Because Ron from North Bay, Ontario is only three hours, you know, Timmins where she's from is only four hours north of me. And I played a lot of hockey up there as a kid. I got family up there. You know, so she's passed through my hometown in North Bay. We played the deer here Deerhurst resort, you know, in the Muskoka areas and, and Southern Ontario. So it's kind of ironic who and he also worked on you know, an album like up by Shanaya was laying on that too. So it's kind of again full circle

Chuck Shute:

you know, I didn't know that that he worked with me but he must have learned a lot from him. Was he just like an engineer or something or what was his role on

Cory Marks:

those records? Okay. Yeah, with with with and and ultimately getting some pretty big gigs after that due to his great work with with bands like Ozzy and Five Finger Death Punch and you know, so it's it's really it's it's one thing to be able to work with a guy like that, but it's an even more incredible feeling to you know, to consider them family and he's been him and his entire family have been such great friends and people to me and since since we met and I'm very fortunate to have the cerco cerco crew my corner

Chuck Shute:

that's amazing and so is that he helped you get the guests on that song outlaws and outsiders because it tough. Mick Mars and Travis tritt and Ivan moody from Five Finger Death Punch and yeah,

Cory Marks:

man, I mean, that was a huge part of it and five finger and motley crew. I'm on the same label as them. The only are the flies they say the flagship country artists on that record label. You know, there's bands like hell yeah. Which had Vinnie Paul and Motley Crue Five Finger Death Punch. And you know, he sent Ivan the song. And Ivan absolutely loved it. I'll never forget I've been FaceTiming me. You know, because they were in Vegas. So I was kind of getting ready to go to bed. It was kind of it was around midnight or something. And I get this FaceTime by Kevin churko he never calls me at this time. It's probably pretty urgent. So I'll pick it up. But it wasn't Kevin. It was Ivan. He's like what's up Corey? Just recorded your song, man. I love it. You know? And it's like, holy shit. That me But no. And so there was that, you know, and then my label, Alan Kovacs was, you know, friends with MC at the time as well too. And, you know, MC loved it. And my manager at the time I believe reached out to Travis tritt. And you know, we all know him. I mean, he's, he's country to the bone, but he also likes to rock a little bit too. So it made total sense, melodically musically and lyrically for all of them. And I'm forever grateful for that one because that's obviously a game changer for me.

Chuck Shute:

Yeah, did they? You didn't actually work in the studio with them? Right? Did they I'm assuming they just sent you the tracks.

Cory Marks:

When I worked with I worked with Travis on this one. The Blackbird studio in Nashville, I joined Travis and actually getting to see a legend like that sing on a song that I wrote. And it being or getting so big. After after these years, and right off, the hop on it was released, it was quite quite a moment and I'll never forget. He told him we were in the studio, and we're just kind of shooting the shit and says, You know what, I'll, I'm going to tell you something right now. You know, he says, this is this is this is kind of what I did when I was your age. And I'll never forget, Waylon Jennings took me aside just like this and said boy, like, you know, I'm gonna pass you the torch to represent country music, and he gave me that torch, you know, to keep going and keep kind of country strong, if you will. And then he just looked up at me and says non passing you the torch. It's your turn. And coming from Travis trip from Whalen to Travis passed on to me, that's a moment I'll never forget. And I kind of feel like I got a job to do. And, you know, I'm definitely gonna do it.

Chuck Shute:

Zam, that is frickin amazing. Now, is that like, your pinch me moment? Is that like, the hurdle that you felt like? You crossed where you felt like, Okay, I made it. This is for real? Or was there another moment, even before that, like when you got signed a better noise music or when you had another big show that you did? Or

Cory Marks:

I think there's just, I mean, this this industry in this life are full of those moments for me, you know, because once you achieve something or once something really cool, like that happens, it's like, okay, well what's next, you know, it's, you live in that moment, you take it in, and you hold on to it. But ultimately, you know, you still got to grow there's still hurdles to jump over, I still got I know I still got many to jump over in this industry, but you know, it's moments like that, that that remind you that you know, you're onto something or you got something special going on and that these guys believe in you or want to be part of it. And you know, want to want to continue pushing you to keep doing what you're doing then you know, those are special in those hard days or those harder days. You kind of got to look back at those and say hey, man, kick yourself in the ass a little bit you know, and keep doing what you're doing. Yeah,

Chuck Shute:

I mean, when another one of those moments was I mean, I guess like us you had Tommy Lee and your music video and you're also in that retaliate errs movie was all that kind of at the same time or the same days.

Cory Marks:

Um, those are at separate times you know, like when when I got the offer to be in the movie as Jimmy the bartender I thought How ironic. But um, you know, as it was kind of being filmed and stuff you know, then I get this email that hey, by the way, Tommy Lee is going to be the DJ at the strip club and we're going to put that in your music video I thought you know to have Tommy Lee and and one of my music videos now I have yet to meet Tommy you know, as you know, there's a lot of pieces to the puzzle that when you're making a movie or something like that even recording is it's kind of like ship it out. They'll do it and you get it back and you know it's a thing but it's pretty surreal to kind of look back on some of these things and have someone like Jason hook rip and guitar and Tyler Conley a theory of a dead man featured vocalist as well and again other two great dudes also Canadian that I call you know that that are dear friends of mine. So it's it's, it's it's a crazy, it's a wild ride. But it is

Chuck Shute:

also a Tommy Lee like, and I know you mentioned your big rush fan too. So do you like the more extravagant kinds of drumming because like I just had David Lee Roth drummer on and he was like, I go do you do drum solos for like when David Lee Roth so he could like step off and they're like, he doesn't know I don't like drum solos. I was like, really? And so or do you like drum solos you like because I love that kind of like Tommy Lee and the roller coaster going upside down? I think that's that's awesome.

Cory Marks:

Well, if I'm if I'm headlining or have 75 At least 75 minutes in my set. It's it's very, it's very common that I get behind the kit mid show and do my own drum solo, as I call. I got to do it. There's another plane coming in really awesome. That's actually it's a 172. So that's the exact same kind of plane that I fly. Wow. But my dad my dad actually named my drum solo since I was a little boy. Then the Neil to Neil It's a kneel it's about down attribute to kneel period. And I do some of the melodic stuff that you'll hear in his drum solos, I will also put into mine to kind of as a tribute and a bow to the professor.

Chuck Shute:

Wow, that so you do like that stuff. Love it,

Cory Marks:

you gotta love that stuff. And that's one thing you don't you don't really see too often anymore and especially in a country shows is a full on anywhere from you know, three to six minute drum solo. And depending again, depending on my time, I'll I will do that I you know, there are some times even going back to high school where it was like a talent show or something. And I was just going off about my kids school dad helped me bring my drunk kid to school and I'm so excited for this thing. And, you know, you're in front of like four or 500 students, and are doing this drum school everyone's going nuts. But the, I guess I was almost but I only had four minutes. But of course, I'm hitting about a six minute mark and I'm still I'm just getting to that cool part. So I just kept going, and my principal shut the power off. And the lights and I just kept going off and everyone stood up and started cheering and going. And I'm like that's that's the joys of having an acoustic drum set as opposed to electronics. That couldn't be off. So I had to I you know, I loosened it up a little bit or, or made a little bit shorter, but still got that kneel to kneel in there. And even now I have friends from high school who weren't, you know, I wasn't you know, hanging out with them. But that were there that day. Well, I get a random message. Hey, man, so cool to see your career take off. I remember. Do you remember that time when you did that drum solo. And the principal turn the power off on you. So it's, it's cool. It's cool to kind of have that like 1520 year look back and like holy shit, you know? But that's amazing. Yeah, a lot of fun.

Chuck Shute:

That's really cool i've ever seen Zoltan Cheney that's like he's like a very visual drummer. I don't know if he's technically any good, but to me, so fun to watch. He stands up and jumps on and lands on he's like animal from the Muppets. Like it's just crazy. Yeah,

Cory Marks:

I don't think I'm as agile as that. But I you know, I might, I might twirl my sticks or throw my sticks or stand up and smash symbols, but that's about as far as I go. As as far as acrobats or something well performing. Yeah,

Chuck Shute:

I mean, so it's cool. You're a fan of all these different genres of music. Aren't you? Also a very big Bryan Adams fan? Did you and I thought I heard you talking about maybe trying to meet him. Did you ever get to meet him?

Cory Marks:

I have not yet Bryan Adams. You know, I've met Merle Haggard. I've met Eric Church. I missing Ozzy and Bryan Adams. Those are the two singer songwriters that I just, I mean, I've always been a fan since I was a kid. But I got to see him live for the first time. About a week not even about a week. Yeah, I guess before going on that tour last year across the states with Five Finger Death Punch and Brantley Gilbert. And it was the first time I saw him and it blew me away and inspired me so much to be a better songwriter or a better singer. That I'm not just saying that, really to have the songs that are 3540 years old, still be completely relevant today. And the band, there's not really there's no Pyro there's not really crazy lights or anything. There's not even a riser for the drummer. It's right off the floor, straight up rock and roll, no tracks. I don't even think I don't even see him take a drink of water. And he sings all the regular keys has come to our show. And it blew me away. And one of the first albums actually the first album I ever bought myself was 18 Till I die. I bought it for my mom for Eastern because she loved she loved Bryan Adams. And that record. She wasn't the only one. And there's you know that song Exactly. 18 Till I die. You know, one day I'll be 18 Going on to 65 and at that time, my dad was 65 and I'm sitting beside him watching Bryan Adams it was just such a moment that certainly won't ever forget. And since then, I've just been man. I mean even on this tour, we do an acoustic part and I'm doing Bryan Adams covers. So I would really love to meet him and actually right after this tour, one of my one of my gifts for Christmas this year is I'm going to Pittsburgh to see Bryan Adams. And it just so happened to be that the New York Rangers are in town the following night. So Bryan Adams Friday night, same arena. We're going to walk back from the hotel and watch Pittsburgh Penguins against the New York Rangers on Saturday. So yeah, I'm, I'm, it's I'm a huge brands fan. And I just so that's one of my that's definitely one of my biggest influences as a singer songwriter. So

Chuck Shute:

it sounds like more than you want to more than just meet him. You'd want to collaborate with him, right? You want to do it right? Write a song with him or something.

Cory Marks:

I would love to collaborate with him. I think it'd be super cool. I know he does a lot of collaborations with with females. And I thought to myself, well, I could put my hair down and make sure to be clean shaven and then we could we could we could still do that song.

Chuck Shute:

Yeah, no, I mean, why? Yeah, he should give me a chance. You're both Canadian, both

Cory Marks:

Canadian. And actually, the cool thing is too, he's from Kingston, Ontario. And that's actually where my music career started as a singer songwriter, going to the Royal Military College of Canada on See in Kingston is where it all started for me. And that's the home of Bryan Adams.

Chuck Shute:

Wow, is there? Is it rare to be a country musician from Canada? I'm trying to think of who are the other ones? Is there any? There's gotta be more though, right?

Cory Marks:

There's Matt laying in the window where

Chuck Shute:

I'm at. Sorry to say that again, is there's not a lot of country musicians from Canada, right?

Cory Marks:

Well there are many others that there's great talent here in this country or both in the country and rock world a lot of lot of great I mean, should I Twain is just one of them, you know, one of many. But there's yeah, there's lots of great pickers and players and singers here in Canada and the country again in the country, genre and rock.

Chuck Shute:

Do you still live in Canada? Or have you relocated?

Cory Marks:

I do I live in Canada still, I'm only about 25 minutes from my hometown of North Bay I live in a small town called sturgeon falls with with my girlfriend and my dog Teslin and I was I was gonna move to Nashville and COVID hit and all that shit but there could be you know, we've been talking about you know, especially this year with new music and new album and all that kind of stuff. Moving down south even just getting an apartment or something there so I can be there two weeks at a time I forgot to be there for a month and you know, we can make that happen. I

Chuck Shute:

didn't Okay, so for some reason, I thought you would relocate it because so how did you get signed a better noise music like how did they find you?

Cory Marks:

Through Kevin churko because Kevin producing five finger numbers or X and Cain as well his son came cerco producing bands like Papa Roach and stuff. You know, we made we made a little an EP package that we sent to them and they loved it right away and then wanted to, you know, start a country venture. So here I am. So

Chuck Shute:

part of it is not just like, like it's kinda is who you know, like, not just where you are. But if you can make that connection even not having to relocate then it works out.

Cory Marks:

Yeah, man. And obviously, like Nashville is like, you gotta live there type town. But, you know, it's a clicky town to just like, you know, here in Canada, you kind of gotta be there. Unless, you know, you can really break that mold and kind of just do your thing and not really kind of care or look too much into the industry side of thing. things, you know, but for me, it's about it's about trying to make the best music as possible that that's, you know, that that people can relate to of all ages and, and all sexes and everything. It's to me, it's just about the music, the art the craft and, and longevity, you know? Yeah. Well,

Chuck Shute:

I think you're doing it. I love the the new song. I love the older stuff. I'm now a fan. So if he had come to Phoenix, I'm in Arizona. We'll come and see you. Hopefully, maybe this maybe not the summer because that's a really hot here but any other time of the year? You're in Phoenix. Yeah. near Phoenix, Scottsdale.

Cory Marks:

I have my my, my cousins live in this attempt a are Tempe, Tempe, Tempe there. That's

Chuck Shute:

a local it's called Tempe. If you're not, you might say 10 or

Cory Marks:

more that if anyone out there is listening. I know how to say it. I just wrong. It's still early here. All right. Well, we'll definitely have yet to show chuck your eye. It's a pleasure talking to you. And I really appreciate you taking the time, man. And if you if you happen to see an Arizona or Phoenix state, let me know and we'll get you out a couple shots of Jack and we'll be rocking and rolling. Alright,

Chuck Shute:

sounds good, Cory. I'll see you later. Thank you, brother.

Cory Marks:

Take care of me too.

Chuck Shute:

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