Chuck Shute Podcast

Year in Review 2023 (with Liz Glazer & Eric Bishop)

December 20, 2023 Liz Glazer, Eric Bishop Season 4 Episode 403
Chuck Shute Podcast
Year in Review 2023 (with Liz Glazer & Eric Bishop)
Show Notes Transcript

Liz Glazer is a comedian, actor, writer and former law professor. Eric Bishop is the author of two books so far- The Body Man & Ransomed Daughter. The three of us sat down to discuss some of the year’s biggest stories including the Sphere, Barbenheimer, the Titan submersible, Taylor Swift, Matt Rife and more!

0:00:00 - Intro
0:00:13 - Welcome Eric & Liz!
0:01:50 - Research & Science
0:03:05 - Liz's Year & Album
0:04:30 - Taylor Swift
0:09:30 - The Sphere & U2
0:14:10 - Barbenheimer, Movies & Strike
0:21:45 - Matthew Perry, Ketamine & Celebrity Deaths
0:26:30 - Titan Submersible & Rich People
0:29:37 - Music Business & Comedy & Success
0:41:25 - Bud Light & Dylan Mulvaney
0:47:05 - Hawaii Wildfires, Oprah & The Rock & Struggles
0:55:20 - Israel & Palestine & Peace
1:12:10 - Chinese Spy Balloon & America Status
1:13:50 - Book Deals & Comedy Dates
1:19:10 - Matt Rife Controversy
1:22:40 - Love of Art & Purpose in Life
1:24:20 - Comedy Plans
1:26:30 - Outro

Liz Glazer website:
http://www.dearlizglazer.com/

Eric Bishop website:
https://www.ericpbishop.com/

Chuck Shute link tree:
https://linktr.ee/chuck_shute

Support the show

Thanks for Listening & Shute for the Moon!

Unknown:

I'm

Eric Bishop:

Eric Bishop, so I am a writer by night, I do finance during the day because I have to, I have to be able to pay for a way to do a creative venture. In this day and age, it's hard to make a living being a writer, or anything creative. So yeah, I do work for corporate America by day and write books at night. On occasion now that I've kind of going down as an indie road, I'm kind of doing all these other business things besides writing a lot of evenings. But

Chuck Shute:

the latest book is ransom daughter, Ransom daughter right

Eric Bishop:

over my shoulder, actually. Yeah. So it's a novella. Actually, that came out back in October, and then I'll have another book coming out of the sequel to my debut book. The body, man, that's the sequel come out in probably late spring, early summer, if I can get my stuff together. All

Chuck Shute:

right. Awesome. Liz. Welcome back.

Liz Glazer:

Thanks, Chuck. I'm Liz Glaser, and I'm a comedian. And this past year, I came out with an album that's not right behind me. It could have been what what if it's there, you know, here, you can't see it. It's you, not me? Oh, yeah, that's fine. So it's right here. And that's my, my debut album called a very particular experience, which is available on anywhere that you can get a song or an album or whatever. And I was on this podcast, to chat with Trac about it. And we had a really, characteristically I love you, chalk. I mean, I remember I'm sure I brought this up the last time I was here, too. But like, Eric, I remember the first time that Chuck and I spoke, and I didn't even know that much about myself as much as he did. Okay, just the level of research. And I guess you said that it's your dad that has instilled in you this ethic about research. I think it's like,

Chuck Shute:

yeah, I get it from him, I think because he wrote a book, he wrote this book. It's an I didn't write it, but he wrote this. And there's like, 500 references in it. It's all about what happens when we die. And it's like Diffic proven things that, you know, doctors and experiments and research and yeah, it's pretty crazy. It's, it's very technical, but it's interesting. Yeah. So myself is more like comedians, rock stars, actors and stuff. I mean, I've had some authors, you know, more scientific people, like I like that stuff. But I hit my dad or recommend people to have on the show, and I'll have them on and I'll be like, I don't understand what they're talking about. But it's interesting. It's I find it

Liz Glazer:

fascinating. Totally. Yeah. Well, anyway, that that's like, I mean, my year I had a baby or my wife had a baby, we had a baby. But I like to be technical about it. It's like let's not, you know, not say who

Chuck Shute:

had one it was like you kept to the surprise, because you were on the show. And yeah, pretty anything, I guess.

Liz Glazer:

Yeah. Well, no, I mean, I probably wouldn't have said anything because we had spoken about because my Eric You may not know this, and maybe somebody listening also doesn't know. But my album is about a stillbirth that my wife and I experienced. And so yeah, but anyway, so like, I think, in light of that, it was like, just I don't know, we were more protective around the information around our expecting I guess. So anyway, because it's Yeah.

Chuck Shute:

Yeah. Yeah. No, but in the album is like, it's so brilliant because I think it's on this roller coaster of like, You're laughing and then it's like, it's like, sad, but then you and that's life. And that's what I really enjoyed about it. So yeah, it's very cool. Thank you. But anyways, um, yeah. So today, I just want to talk about all the crazy stuff that's going on in the world in the past year, we can rewind. And so you know, we could start with we talked about some light things, some dark things, just just like your album there. But I guess the first thing I'll bring up is Taylor Swift. I feel like this is the year of Taylor Swift.

Liz Glazer:

So this is the dark the dark section, we're going dark.

Eric Bishop:

But she's shucks podcast is brought to us by the NFL. Apparently.

Chuck Shute:

She's Person of the Year. I mean, Travis Kelce. So now she's in the NFL, she's got a tour. She's got a movie. She's adding like money to like these economies like these are getting millions of dollars is different cities and countries like, right

Liz Glazer:

and she's like the new Warren Buffett moving markets. You know,

Chuck Shute:

what do you guys think? Do you have opinions? I like to Ever swift I guess I mean, I'm not a swift Yeah, but how big of fans are you guys?

Liz Glazer:

My wife is a huge fan. And so you know, going back to some of the dark like when, when we had the stillbirth, it was when that 10 minute song with the scarf was happening. That's like my level of fan ship is I'm like, I don't know what it is. All I know, is it was playing on repeat a lot when she was in the shower during that period. So, you know, I mean, I liked Taylor Swift. I've liked Taylor Swift for years, I guess like before, she was like, enormous, enormous. Like she was still a famous person, but I feel like something. Right? It's like, it's like a volcano exploded. Like we always knew it was there. And it was notable, but then also now it's like, why? So anyway, yeah, but I can enjoy Taylor Swift. My daughter loves Taylor Swift, which I noticed because I played some Taylor Swift, and then she does they're like, you know, dancing or whatever. She's six months old. So you can really tell if she likes something. But yeah, I mean, I did, like a short video on this because it was just like a silly thing. But I ended up posting it of like, with her and Travis. Like, because, you know, this was at the time when everyone was like, Oh, is it a stunt? Or whatever? Yeah. I was like, what if I just sends from Taylor Swift? Again? Do I know the gal? Yes, I do know. But I just said, it's like, what if she's in it for love? You know, like, what if? What if she's just like, trying to find the guy in her life? You know, and, and this is this is the the thing of now and maybe it'll work and whatever. So I don't know. It's not a hot take. But that's, that's what I believe.

Chuck Shute:

Eric, what do you think? Are you Taylor Swift? Are you Swifty?

Eric Bishop:

I'm not a Swifty. I'm not an anti swift either. I'm, I know some of her songs. I will say the one thing that kind of warmed my heart towards her was months ago, when they the news came out that she basically had given $100,000 to each truck driver and people that did catering and all that she gave away something like 50 million or 25 minutes, I saw that to millions of dollars she gave out. And so especially with the exposure I had last year with, with bands with doing some traveling and seeing how it works, seeing the people that set up the rigs and you know, do the lighting, catering, seeing all that experience and knowing that she will Yes, you could say, well, she had the money, it wasn't a big deal. Yeah, but a lot of people don't do it. Right. And she didn't have to give a dime away. And no one's coming there to see Taylor Swift truck driver, they're all there to see Taylor Swift. So she gets the vast majority of the money because she's drawn the crowd. So for her to, you know, whether it's 50 million or 25 million, however much it costs her to you know, and that's when you give it $100,000 To a truck driver, or to someone that's knows catering or you know, costumes, life altering money, at least for that year, and you know, they can go down payment on a house. So that was a cool thing. That the Travis thing. Yeah, I don't know. And I don't know, I know. She's dated a bunch of different guys. And there's always these rumors of are they part of their songs and all this stuff? I think for her probably the level she's at. for her. I think she just got done with relationship at some point back for years. And it was like a not a no name guy, but least not a Taylor Swift. Not someone super famous. I almost think she has to have someone pretty famous. Because how do you have someone that can't understand? And to stay in the background where he's, you know, he's a big dude. He's pretty well known the NFL. He's charismatic. He does commercials. Probably a good fit for her because they can feed off each other in the sense of getting the attention and all that and so

Liz Glazer:

and you don't want to Kevin Federline either you know what I mean? Like you don't? You don't want to pull someone out from nowhere. Oh,

Eric Bishop:

unless you want to be paying another 50 million a year to some dude. No, and

Liz Glazer:

this truck driver,

Chuck Shute:

Kevin federal,

Eric Bishop:

former baby mama and all the

Chuck Shute:

fire. Okay, what about? Here's another big story. This is cool. Eric, you could definitely chime in on this one because the sphere this was a big thing that came in Vegas. It's this giant like ball thing. It looks so cool. You actually got to go and see you too. In Vegas. How was that? It looked amazing son

Eric Bishop:

touched Bano. How's that? That little shit got to touch Bondo. And I didn't know he's an amazing human being. Yeah, so that was we went on November 4, right before my birthday. I had gotten tickets like six months ago. It was a fiasco trying to get tickets I almost gave up the day they went out last minute. I kept trying and my son was in the other room. And I was just in in here yelling, because I would think I'd have tickets and it would say you've got two tickets there 150 each. And I'm like, Yeah, sure. And I get to like purchase button and it would say those tickets are taken. Next one's available, or 1500 per ticket. And I'm like, no. So I that went on for like 30 minutes. And so I started looking at some other dates, I guess there was so much demand that day, they released some other dates. And then you know, I'm looking at dates trying to think when to I have custody of my kids. And it was just, it was a nightmare. And then I get two tickets for floor seats, or not even seats or standing room. And I got him. And so that was like June. And so I had months to prepare and so flew up to Vegas, it was difficult with work, I ended up having to work on the hotel, the Luxor and you know, kind of one of these calamities, but that morning, we went and the line started, whatever time you wanted to be there, you had to be in line and at 830, they would give out number of wristbands for when you could come back in the evening for the show and get in. So we were there at 620 I think in the morning, and we were number 86 and 87. But in talking to some of the people that have already gone to the show, they're like, No, that's good, because you're going to get close to the front. And sure enough, we ended up getting we could have got right on the rail in front of the edge when we got lead in at six o'clock that night. But instead we went to the center and we were about three or four people back. And then yeah, by no during until the end of the world came into the crowd and laid backwards on the crowd. And right before we got up my son we got he got a push a gentle push from one of the people we're with pushes my son a little forward and he reaches out and grabs binos arm and then Vano got up and my son turns around he goes, Yeah, I know. And I'm like, holy shit.

Chuck Shute:

Oh, wait, how much were the tickets though?

Eric Bishop:

I'm the ones we got for the floor tickets. I think we're about 250 A ticket. That's nuts. The people behind us that had seats in the 100 section 1500 At least some of those. I

Liz Glazer:

would be spending the entire concert asking everyone how much they paid. The whole time.

Chuck Shute:

It does look cool, though. Right. Have you seen the footage lives of the spear? I don't think I have. Yeah, check that out after I can look. Yeah. And they also like the outside. They do these different things and they've made it look like a pumpkin for Halloween and like, it just looks really cool. I don't know. It's unmarked, magical.

Eric Bishop:

If you're not familiar with it, Liz, it's a pure. It looks like the Deathstar. It's rounded. It almost looks like a glow kind of thing without the minut little little divot in it. But it's all digital. So outside, I think there's like, I don't know, 180,000 lights or something. That's all I can make. They can make the outside look like a globe, a smiley face a volcano, put words on there, and it looks really cool. Well then inside. Inside is where it looks like a Death Star because it's kind of like tiered where you have the floor seats. Then you have the one hundreds and two hundreds and it goes up. But everything's digital. So when we get in there, you know we're we're in there a couple hours for the show started. It looked like a cathedral and I've been to Europe several times. It looked like an old European cathedral. Dome, it had a hole in the top, you know, it's digital. So you know it's fake. I'm watching this bird fly from like one buttress to another. And so I bumped the guy next to me and I'm like, How the hell did a bird get in here? And he's like, Dude, that's totally fake. It's all digital. And I'm like, digital, but it is real

Chuck Shute:

in real life. Is it because when you see the videos, yeah, you're like, I mean, they have like dinosaur thing. And it looks like a dinosaur is right. It's crazy. Yeah, I don't know. 100%

Eric Bishop:

real. And then there's, there's no visible speakers. So the speakers are also built in. So the sound is great. The audio is great. And then my favorite show before that was actually a YouTube show. And this show blew it out of the water. There's no yeah, the show.

Chuck Shute:

I'm not even a YouTube fan. But I feel like I would see that just to see the sphere or whatever. But anyway, so there's that and then the other big entertainment news. Farben Heimer everyone's This is like the weirdest combination. I don't know who came up with this, but it's like the Barbie movie and Oppenheimer. Yeah, Oppenheimer. I didn't see Barbie.

Liz Glazer:

I only saw Barbie. I didn't see Oppenheimer. Okay, perfect. So we guys saw it either.

Chuck Shute:

Oh, okay, so we got one of these so but yeah, cuz I thought Barbie I was like, This doesn't look like something I'd be interested in. I saw Oppenheimer because I heard was so good. I was kind of disappointed with it i i thought it was kind of almost like pro bomb. It was very we it was almost like they were kind of putting this movie out to be like, see the the bomb wasn't that bad, right? Like, it didn't really show the aftermath and the part that like that we should learn from like, like pro

Liz Glazer:

in the sense of like, the science that okay.

Chuck Shute:

He did. He was you know, he was so brilliant and he was trying to help Will people and I'm like, Yeah, but I mean, the the aftermath like, yeah, they were going to show all that so that that was going to be the lesson that people learned like, we should never do this again. And it was like kind of that wasn't the kind of glossed over that it was like we

Liz Glazer:

work hard and you can make a bomb.

Chuck Shute:

That was the lesson. Yeah, it was. It was kind of interesting for

Eric Bishop:

us it was it only killed the commoners. kabocha. It just killed commoner. It's okay. The elites were fine. We're okay with

Liz Glazer:

it. Yeah, Barbie, I thought was fun. I saw it on my birthday. And so, you know, it was like, really? I mean, it's, it's interesting. Like, the stuff that we've already touched on in terms of news stories, I feel like lend themselves to this discussion as well, which is like now, movies have become this outing. Again, right? Because like, for many years, it's like, the movies are just like, I don't know, no big deal, whatever. And then they got so expensive. And now I feel like they are really expensive. But like, for example, I mean, I did see Barbie, but the reason I was thinking about it is like everybody, I think my wife got us some kind of pink shoes, special shoes that we wore. Yeah, that we weren't like, I think they were flip flops that were like, fuzzy or whatever. And we wore them to see Barbie. And, you know, I think it added to the experience. And also it is a good movie. I mean, it's funny. It's like smart and whatever. I don't know if it was like anything that I was like, I need to see that again. It was pretty, I would say pretty heavy handed in terms of the lessons, but also very clever, and the songs are really good. And so

Chuck Shute:

Robbie, I mean, I do love her. Yeah, totally. Like

Liz Glazer:

everything was good about it's just like, to me, it's not clueless, like clueless to me, it was a revelation. It again, I saw it, you know, now I'm 44 years old, am I going to see a movie that's going to be a revelation to me at 44? Maybe, but if I see it when I'm in high school, you know, I would say the odds are higher in terms of it hitting me that way. But I also think that clueless was like a better movie. I mean, honestly, the other movie we saw the same day, because we saw two movies on my birthday was theater camp, which I imagined doesn't make the news or anything like that. But that was terrific. That was like a really, really good movie. And, you know, I thought was like, in terms of just sheer storytelling, not anything like Hollywood ish. Beyond that. I thought was better.

Chuck Shute:

Really? Did you Did either of you seen the movie quiz lady? Because that is one of the funniest movies I've seen in a long time. Actually, I

Liz Glazer:

didn't see it. What is it about like a person on a game show?

Chuck Shute:

Yeah, so it's like two Asian ladies. And the one is like, she's kind of like a party girl and the other their sisters. And the other girls like she's like really nerdy and she watches this quiz show every night. And the other sister like, signs her up. And then she gets picked to go. And she's it's like a road trip. It's just, it's really silly. And funny, I think. I thought it was really funny. I was surprised. It didn't get bigger. They thought Hulu, I don't know if you guys have that. But yeah, wow, that's actually like a really fun. I feel like it's they don't make a lot of funny movies in Hollywood anymore. And this one actually made me laugh out loud several times?

Liz Glazer:

Well, we do have to I don't know if the strike was the reason that it didn't get as promoted quiz lady specifically, but like, you know, there is that to consider for this year. Right?

Chuck Shute:

Yeah, were you part of them? Because you're Are you part of the I mean,

Liz Glazer:

I am but like, I, I just kind of thought like some of the people I know who are, you know, I do know, people who are heavily affected by it. And also I know people who wish they were heavily affected by it. And I would say that I fall into that camp. And I I've never pretended that I've not in that camp, you know, so like, I mean, I did something on television this year. That was like before the strikes. So that's lucky. And then, you know, I'm sorry, I am a SAG member. That also happens to me this year, but it was too late to vote in the should we strike thing. Fine. I don't really care. I mean, you know, I care but I'm just being real about like, the level that I care. And yeah, like it affected me in terms of like, I had fewer auditions. But the nature of me auditioning is like sometimes I do book stuff, but it's not. You know, it wasn't like affecting my day to day livelihood. I mostly do stand up and you could still do stand up.

Chuck Shute:

Yeah. Well, one thing that was interesting about the strike is that and Eric and I talked about this when on the episode I had him on was the AI part because the AI that Hollywood was going to use like AI to recreate people and stuff and they Somebody just steal their likeness and make movies. Yeah. Eric and I talked about for authors how they could use, you can make an AI book, and, you know, make it sound like a John Grisham novel or something. I mean, I have a scary like, I don't know, that's hopefully they sorted it out with the actors guild. I

Liz Glazer:

don't think they did. I don't I think that whatever, whatever the current best deal is, has some pretty scary and questionable AI stuff. I mean, I tend to not get that scared about that stuff, not because it won't necessarily affect me, but like, I just refuse to get too scared about stuff like that, like, nobody, nobody's killing me directly. And if if there's not like a literal gun in my face, and I'm not going to die, I'm not going to get that bent out of shape or other people die. You know, like, I don't know, I think just like having tragedy in my life. gives me some perspective where it's like, okay, so I might make a few fewer dollars. I think I'll be okay. But

Chuck Shute:

you don't think you're not worried about like being eventually like replaced by a robot? No. Okay. Well, that's bizarre, but yeah, it definitely worries me. Yeah, I find out in our lifetime, at least. Yeah,

Liz Glazer:

I just, I don't know. I just can't get it up to like, worry so much about that. I'm not saying it's not gonna happen to me. I just don't care

Eric Bishop:

is gonna happen. We're all gonna die when they when the machines turn the bomb on. So it doesn't matter.

Chuck Shute:

Yeah. I did not worry about it. Yeah, I just I worry about stuff too much.

Liz Glazer:

No, I mean, I worry so much. But like, it's interesting, because like that kind of stuff. Now. I really don't worry about it.

Chuck Shute:

Yeah. Well, one tragedy that did occur this year. I mean, there's so many there's always like a bunch of celebrity deaths. But I think the one for me that was Matthew Perry just because he's so yeah, that was the 54 Something like that. And it was a very weird circumstances. Now, I guess I found out I think was yesterday today, it came out that he was the he had ketamine. And,

Liz Glazer:

but I was like talking to some people who were like, well, but was it the ketamine? Really? I mean, I don't know. Because, you know, ketamine is pretty hot right now. I don't take I've taken it in my life, but I don't take it actively. But you know, there's like, like ketamine therapy and stuff like that. Do

Eric Bishop:

people so that they won't have the drug addictions? Is that what it is? Right?

Chuck Shute:

Well, I think it's as funny actually, I just had the guy who plays Dexter. He was on my show, cuz he's a handsome man. And he has a song called ketamine. And it's about him doing him and his girlfriend did the ketamine therapy for depression. Right. And so yeah, that is like a trendy thing. But I wonder if it was prescribed, or he was just taking it for fun, or, I mean, it's kind of like, it's always just sad when you see these people who are so talented, and, you know, just so beloved. And it seems like they're just not happy.

Liz Glazer:

Yeah. Yeah, I mean, right. Like, and my question was just like, you know, in what context? Did you have ketamine in him and stuff. I took it like off. I just remember, I was at a party. I went with this guy. This was like, many years ago, to move my car. He had some ketamine and I took it. And my brother was like, I've never seen you look so stoned, or whatever, like, and But that said, you know, it wasn't in any kind of supervised situation. Yeah. I mean, that's, I think the reason that it's like an Up Roar, is because people are doing it in these ways that are like, good, allegedly.

Chuck Shute:

Well, yeah, cuz like, I think he had more than what you're supposed to take. Oh, yeah. And I don't know if it's if he just, I don't know, like, you get into the conspiracy. You're like, maybe somebody gave it to him, because he knew bound something. You know, like, there you go down that rabbit hole, too. But either way, it's just tragic. I mean, obviously, yeah. suffered with drug and alcohol issues is life and it is very well documented. But, I mean, it's just, it's just sad. There's just too many stories like that. Like, I'm just, I hate seeing. I mean, obviously, you know, because there's other celebrities that died like Tina Turner. I mean, but she was like, 83. And she had an amazing life. And that's like a long life. But when someone's in their 50s, it's like, it scares me because I'm 45 and I'm like, am I gonna die in seven years? Like, that's kind of?

Liz Glazer:

I really hope you don't.

Chuck Shute:

Thank you. Thank you. I'm

Liz Glazer:

really I'm

Eric Bishop:

47. So I'd go before you Chuck. I'd hit it first. So my hope

Liz Glazer:

you don't also Eric and I hope I don't you know, yeah, it is really scary. But also it's like, you know, I don't I want to read your dad's book, Chuck, but like, it's kind of the thing that is the scariest is just the unknown. I think that's why I don't care so much about like It contracts and you know, who's going to steal my likeness? Because it's like, that's the stuff is like dying, you know, that I worry about. But then I wonder if your dad's book would help me not worry. Do you think it would? Yeah,

Chuck Shute:

I think so. Yeah. Cuz I think it kind of gives a little bit of clarity. And yeah, I mean, basically like, I asked him at the I think I asked him when I had him on my podcast, and we talked about it. And I just asked him like, what, what is like the main takeaway book? And he's like, he's like, Well, like, there is an afterlife. He's like, I don't know what it is. I don't know. Like, I can't tell you exactly what happens or but he's like, I think that there is the book, the title of the book, ultimate reality is I think there is another reality that we cross over to. He's like, I don't know all the scientifics and what exactly it looks like, and you know, all that stuff. But there is something out there. So I mean, to me, that's like, it gives you hope, I guess. I

Liz Glazer:

love hope.

Eric Bishop:

Since Liz is the stand up person I don't want to pretend to ever have done stand up because I haven't. But there is a joke out there about that years ago. I don't remember who did it. But they were talking about what people are afraid of. Yeah. And the lack of public speaking is about death. And so whoever the comic was basically said, so if you're at a funeral, you know, the person that's speaking at the funeral. That's more you're more fearful than one being in the casket. Yeah,

Chuck Shute:

yeah. I think that's classic. Yeah, yeah, totally. Let's see what else is going on the ones this year, kind of so many AI stuff and talking about that. This was a weird story, because it just, I don't know. Sometimes I think some news stories like they show like people's reaction to the story almost is a bigger story than the story itself. Check. You guys remember the Titan? What was it called the submersible submersible? That blew up? Yes, they were going down to look at the Titanic. And you're like, Okay, well, that's terrible. It's a sad thing. Also, like, the people that ran this business, we're probably not the greatest people in the world. But I think what was interesting to me was just seeing the reactions from people that were like, good, they died, these fucking billionaires, these assholes, like these rich people, they get what they deserve. And it was just like, Whoa, I mean, I understand, like, some hatred towards rich people. But it just seemed kind of like, out of place. Like you're like, isn't this a tragedy when someone dies innocently? Like, I don't think you're trying to hurt anybody by going to look at the Titanic

Eric Bishop:

to the billionaires wasn't a billionaires teenager or someone?

Liz Glazer:

Yeah, it was it was his son. But I mean, I think I say I said that with such authority that

Eric Bishop:

links Oh, yeah, I think you're right. Go with it. Own it. Yeah.

Liz Glazer:

I mean, well, I just like to also own when I barely might have remembered something. But I mean, I agree with you, Chuck. And just to put the other side out there, not because I agree with it, because I think you're right, it's tragic when people die, no matter what. But, you know, the idea of like, somebody being a billionaire probably means that they've caused deaths of people who have gotten them to that level of stratospheric wealth. You know, I do understand that kind of, I guess, like, you know, it's like, this wasn't wasn't the story with like, the Amazon workers like, dying, like at Amazon on the floor, or something. You have talking about?

Chuck Shute:

This? No, but I know that there was some really horrible conditions that I heard. Yeah. Makes sense to me. Because I was like, okay, Amazon's got money. Like, they shouldn't be like, Costco has really good money. And they're, like, really good. Worker conditions from what I can there. Yeah, they pay their employees really well. So like, why would you not pay your employees? Well, and why would you not give them it doesn't make any sense. Like, just to get a little bit of extra like, so yeah, I agree. I mean, if that's the case, then Yeah, fuck him, I guess. I don't know. I don't know the whole No,

Liz Glazer:

I don't mean, I don't mean it as simply as like, Fuck all of them. I just mean that, you know, I have, I've just read and heard stuff to that effect, where it's like, if you have that much money, it doesn't come from not like at some point, you've like, screwed someone very severely. So I just put that out there, not because it's right. Yeah,

Chuck Shute:

I had this music producer who's produced like, tons of like, 70s and like, cheap trick and all the 70s and 80s bands. And he had the same he was telling me basically, he's a very successful producer, but he was telling me a lot of the same things. I said, What was your favorite bands to work with? And he said, most of the bands that were my favorite were the nice people were the ones that you never heard of. Yeah, he thought of the people that were successful in the music This had to step over somebody else to get there and they screwed people over. So, yeah,

Liz Glazer:

well, and also it's like, you know, I don't know the story specifically with that music producer or the bands who he was talking about, but it could be that they're the bands might not be like super famous, but that they're working and successful bands in a way, even if they're not like household names, you know?

Chuck Shute:

Oh, definitely. Yeah, for sure. I think that a lot of, there's some bands that like, I mean, it's great, though, because I'm, I go really deep into music and some of the bands. I mean, they had like two MTV videos in the 80s. And they're still half career based off of that, which

Liz Glazer:

is Yeah, I saw Rick Astley in 2017. Because I was a really big Rick Astley fan. Like when I was a kid, you know, I guess I was like, a young adolescent at the time that he was like, big. And was really into him. And then like, you know, he was touring. So I went. And it's like, interesting. It's interesting to see somewhat like he's not, I mean, he probably has like a ton of money from before, right?

Chuck Shute:

Yeah. Well, the one hit. I mean, I feel like they're still playing. Like, I don't know how that all works with the rolling. Yeah, like that song is played so much. But how much does he get from that? I don't know. Yeah, so like, I feel like he might be one of those ones, too. That is big overseas and might have like, other hits, like what's the one guy? Oh, God, what is his name that he? He has a song and he's like, he only has like, he's a one hit wonder here. But in Europe, he's like, huge. Oh, interesting. Yeah, a lot of guys like people like that.

Liz Glazer:

Yeah, well, for me, Rick Astley was definitely not a one hit wonder. I knew all of his songs. I don't know. The new Hello album called 50. That was in 2017. Because I think he was turning 50. And people in the crowd knew all the words and whatever I did not. But I think he's since come out with more music, if I'm not mistaken, anyway. But just saying that was a great

Chuck Shute:

tangent to talk about.

Liz Glazer:

Thank you.

Chuck Shute:

I don't know if you wanted to add anything, Eric, about Titan sub or whatever. If you haven't.

Eric Bishop:

Well, you talk about the music I was gonna add on that is there's so many talented people out there. So I had you've talked with you offline, obviously. And you know, my connection with the band Shinedown. Yeah. So I took my son Saturday down to Charleston. And we went to Eric basses house, his studio. And, you know, he just spent my son's interested in music. And Eric is such a phenomenal human being that literally spent like seven hours with us. And a lot of that was focused on my son. So my son and him in the studio jammed out to Shinedown songs. They were playing some guns and roses, some ACDC. And it was just like, as a dad, I'm just sitting back there and just soaking it in, basically. But my son asked him a lot of pertinent questions, too, like, how do you make a career out of this? What's the right, what, you know, what missteps Have you made and all that? And I mean, Eric sat there for like an hour and just kind of like, you, okay, if I give him advice, I was like, Dude, that's what we're here. Give it everything to him. He's gonna absorb it. And we'll you know, just what do you think and but he taught, Eric talked about how, you know, people that quote, unquote, make it, there's so many people out there that are really, really, really good, just as good as him in his mind that they don't get that chance. They don't get that opportunity. And my two cents on that, which I always try to add to my son, because I don't believe in luck. I don't, I just don't believe it. I think you put in the work, you put yourself out there. And sometimes that connects with the right people. And but at the end of the day, you didn't just see me unless you win Powerball wish, you could say that's luck. Obviously, I can't argue that. But you created something, you did something to put yourself on that path to whether it's to create something, or to meet somebody to introduce something you created. So you did something to start that ball rolling. And so what I try to tell my son is, that's why if you're into music, you have to go pretty hard into it. Because you don't know what's going to happen. It might not get to pay your bills. You might never record you know, an album and have Excel, but you can make music. And if you make music, maybe that music will take off. And maybe that will put you on a path that's like what Shinedown happened or bigger than them or less than them but follow your passions. And that's what Eric was saying to Eric was saying, Do what you feel like you should be doing. Don't worry about what am I going to be successful. Don't worry about all the other things that you can't control. What you can control is to work hard and to put your passion into that project. So it was

Liz Glazer:

and that was what the people did when they went to go see the Titanic. And you know, that's unfortunately sometimes it doesn't work out.

Eric Bishop:

Sometimes you blow up. Yes Literally and figuratively.

Chuck Shute:

Do you feel the same way Liz about comedy, though? Because it's probably the same. I mean, I see so many talented, not only musicians, but also comedians. And I'm like, why is this guy not bigger? You know, why is this? And I don't know, I don't even have the answers. There's people that make me crack up so hard. I think I've told you like, but he I think is hilarious. I think he's one of my favorite comedians. He's got some success, but I think he should be like, the biggest comedian in the world. And yeah, so I don't know why that is. But it is, I

Liz Glazer:

think. I mean, so number one, there's a really good documentary that my friend Josh Adelman made about a comedian named Al Lubell, who isn't a tremendous comedian. He's great. And he's not famous, and Josh's documentary, which is entitled mentally owl, and won awards for you know, like the New York Times Best Comedy documentary. And, you know, if you ever want to connect with Josh, I'm happy to introduce or whatever. But anyway, the documentary is so interesting, because it's really about why al isn't famous. And so there are so many documentaries about like, here's like the behind the music or the behind the success or whatever. And it's kind of the opposite. And it's like he, I mean, Josh, interviews in the documentary, Kevin Nealon, and Judd Apatow and Sarah Silverman and, you know, Jerry Seinfeld's favorite joke, I guess, on record is a joke of ALS. And so it's like, he's amazing. And he's not famous. And I would say that, like, in the front, it's been a while since I watched the documentary, it's really great. But I would say that, like the the upshot, one of the lessons that I took from it is that the being famous is almost like another job. And another choice, separate from the talent that is the foundation for whatever fame someone might have. And so you know, to your point, Eric, that, like, it's not about luck. It's like putting in the work to do the music. And then if the idea is for every single person to know your name, or to sell out huge stadiums, or whatever it is like that, too, isn't luck, you could say, and is a choice and requires the work to be put in for that specifically. And I think

Eric Bishop:

some people that get to those levels, realize that they don't want to be at that level, and they almost are pigeon holed to probably sticking with it sometimes. What they find it very, I think that's where like drugs come into the picture for people and stuff like that, is they it's a very lonely existence to be at the top.

Chuck Shute:

Like, not to interrupt, but you made me think of Kurt Cobain. Yeah, like that's a guy that seemed to not want to be that sucks. Like he wanted to be a musician. But I think he was like thinking he's going to be like this, like indie rock guy, right? Have a little bit of success. did not want to be the biggest rock star in the world.

Eric Bishop:

Dave girls book, the storyteller. I listened to it back in October on a drive up to upstate New York for a wedding. So I had like a 13 hour, 14 hour drive. And I listened to the whole book. And he dives into Kurt especially pretty hard of what happened with him. And yeah, absolutely. I mean, he was the stories of how they, they hadn't made it. And then when they made it, they blew up. And it just for Kurt, it was probably the worst for Dave it worked out. That didn't affect him in the way it affected Kirpa for Kirk, it was horrific for him. So be careful what you wish for, you know, yeah,

Liz Glazer:

yeah. And I guess, you know, I mean, not that I would know, but like, be prepared for that to hit, I guess. Because, you know, I mean, I used to take this acting class that was like really not an acting class. It was like, a kind of a cult with unlicensed therapy by a man who has since been canceled. But it was basically a class I was fine. I mean, he didn't have any interest in me, which was like the best gift but But it was basically a class about how to be famous. And I remember he said, you know, he's like, make sure that you get like, even though he's like kind of horrible in a variety of ways. Like he really did have some some good gems and lessons and stuff. And a lot of it was related to like, be okay with your whole all the messiness and like, you know, get sober get like, whatever just, or I mean, I guess he wouldn't say necessarily get sober, although I did. And I think that he was influential in that and I don't think he was sober. But basically like, if you can handle drugs now and like you're not famous, like, just figure it out before, you know was kind of his message. And so I always keep that in mind. I mean, Not because I think he's the greatest teacher in the world or anything, but just because like, there were a lot of lessons that I felt like I took from there. And I've seen, you know, friends who seem to not have that in them, and then stuff happens that's really big. And it's like, okay, I don't know that you're handling this exact like, it seems like not fun for you, you know?

Chuck Shute:

Really. So you've had, you've had friends that have really blown up, personally.

Liz Glazer:

Yeah. Oh, yeah, totally. And like, I mean, especially now where it's like so, you know, democratized in terms of content creation and stuff, like somebody can really blow up overnight. And I don't know, like, that affects people differently. I think that if you go into it with a plan of like, I want to monetize, and here's what I want the money to go do and like, really have like a plan about it than that. And again, I'm just speaking from my own. Not experience of it happening to me, but just sort of like being somebody who's thought about this quite a lot in my personal life and managing my life. Separate from fame, I guess. But yeah, like just seeing somebody, I don't know, like, freak out about, like, a comment on a tick tock or something. And I'm like, what, you know,

Chuck Shute:

okay, well, this is a good transition, then. Because, yeah, I think we kind of briefly touched on this. And when you were on my show last time, but you know, you were in a class, was this the class you were in with Dylan Mulvaney? No, that's different one. Okay. Because that's one of the biggest stories of the year, the whole Bud Light thing. And I mean, it's just such an interesting thing to me. Because it just seems like there's so much division in this country. And that was like, a perfect example of people just, you know, picking aside and, and I just felt bad for Dylan in a way, because, you know, she was just like, Oh, cool. They gave me a Bud Light can and then people like, hate it on her. And, and she had a good point, she's like, Bud Light didn't stick up for me. And it's like, your Bud Light. And you say, I'm gonna, you know, we're gonna have this person promote our brand. They like, didn't they just like, pulled the plug? And they're like, Oh, we want nothing to do with you. And like, that was kind of messed up now. Like, you know, Kid Rock, shot up the beer cans or whatever. And now he's saying, like, oh, we forgive Bud Light. I mean, I guess some people could just look at it from a marketing perspective and say, this is just bad marketing, because it was off brand. What I don't know, what do you guys think? Because that was a big story. Yeah,

Liz Glazer:

I mean, and I don't, I was in class with Dylan, a different class, and a more recent class, but I don't, I don't know Dylan. All that well, although she's perfectly lovely. And, you know, we were in class together on Zoom. So that's how I know her. And I remember that she started her kind of Internet Public journey. By doing however many days like 365, or however many of becoming a girl or being a girl. And that was like the content that she created on her own. That got her a lot of publicity. That led to the Bud Light deal and other stuff that was more positive, I think, overall. And I know that there was a lot of backlash. I don't know, personally, it's not like, you know, we talk on the phone or anything like that about anything. But also not, you know, that story. But yeah, I mean, I've, I've felt bad as I've learned these details, because it's like, there's a person on the other end of it, you know, so that's kind of how I've thought of it because I do know her, you know, even a little bit, I

Eric Bishop:

think it shows the fickleness of the corporate. And I work for a corporation, but the corporate entities that are out there, I mean, their bottom line, so it Bud Light, looked at the numbers, and all of a sudden, you know, whatever, 25% of the market shares disappearing because of this, then yeah, but lights gonna throw it anybody under the bus, because all ultimately Bud Light cares about is selling more beer.

Chuck Shute:

Well, how that started in the first place, because they said, Okay, we have like, a bunch of dudes drink beer, and we want to get, we want to get more women to drink Bud Light. So we're trying to like get like this much more of a market share. And then it just blew up in their face.

Eric Bishop:

Right. And I want to say that I don't remember all the details with the story. But I want to say Dylan wasn't the only like, it wasn't just a marketing campaign just for Dylan. I think they like they did a bunch around the country of all different folks. Yes,

Chuck Shute:

there was like hundreds of people and they found that 1/3 One Yeah. And then that was the thing that so that's just kind of what's what's interesting. too, it's like, like also like, Why do you care? Like to me, I didn't have a dog in the fight because

Eric Bishop:

I don't like Bud Light. So I don't I was gonna say I don't drink Bud Light anyway,

Chuck Shute:

I wouldn't drink it anyway. So I didn't really, I just was I sat back and watch that. And I was like, this is really interesting to just watch this play out in real time. Yeah,

Liz Glazer:

well, and I guess, you know, depending what I hope, and I don't know whether this is true for Dylan or not. But what I hope for her is that however, this has shaken out that it aligns in some way with her kind of overall goals for her business. You know, where it's a lesson, it's a chapter in the book, it's the reason for the book deal. It's the reason for this public appearance, or that public appearance and like being at the heart of a major controversy can be, you know, a real credit. Ultimately, in terms of like, this is how we know you, you're a major player, so you can make who knows how much money to do a public speaking engagement or something like that? And I just hope for her that that's there. You know, I imagine it is but I don't know for sure. And I do I do hope.

Chuck Shute:

Yeah, I think I mean, she just got more famous and probably I'm sure he have a bunch of Tik Tok followers. Now even

Liz Glazer:

it's even more. Right, right.

Chuck Shute:

And then Bud Light, I think I think they're, I guess they're coming back. I guess people are drinking now. There was like, literally just bang, I think they're there. And what was sad is like, their stock was tanking. But like all the people that you're talking about, like the truck drivers and stuff earlier, like those people were like, out of work, and they're like, oh, okay, I guess I don't have a job now.

Liz Glazer:

Gotta go work for Taylor Swift.

Chuck Shute:

Is 100 grand a year? I

Liz Glazer:

would do that. Yeah, totally.

Eric Bishop:

Let's see what else Taylor. We're

Liz Glazer:

all drive a truck.

Chuck Shute:

For 100 grand,

Eric Bishop:

I would throw some Bud Light in the back. It's fine. Just

Chuck Shute:

another big story. This was so weird to me, just because I know stuff happens in Hawaii, but the Hawaii wildfires. I mean, that wiped out like an entire town. I don't know exactly how it started. But I think what the interesting part is

Eric Bishop:

laser started at Chuck's base laser was yes,

Chuck Shute:

but so the interesting part to me was, this is another thing kind of like the Titanic thing where people like hate rich people, is Oprah and the rock got on TV. And they're like, Hey, guys, like we're trying to raise money for the victims of why like, and can you give money to people were like, so pissed that they were asking for money. They're like, why don't you give them money? You guys are millionaires. I think Oprah is a billionaire. And I think they only get they only gave 10 million, which 10 million? I think, yeah, it's almost so it's almost like it's better to like lay low and just not say anything than to try to, like, do a fundraiser and start off with 10 million. I don't know.

Liz Glazer:

Well, and also, it's like a weird thing, where if you're that famous, you probably should hire someone who's kind of famous, but not you, Oprah or the rock. You know, like someone like a Dylan Mulvaney or, you know, whatever, like somebody who's not Oprah, but still can mobilize and like reach a large audience just because then they're not going to get heat for how much they personally are or aren't giving. I mean, not to be like a business adviser on this, but I think that

Chuck Shute:

she should have given more though. Like, I mean, just I don't know how much money she

Liz Glazer:

probably. I mean, sure. I don't know, you know,

Eric Bishop:

50 50 million Oprah could have done 500 million come on Taylor

Chuck Shute:

Swift give 50 million to the Hawaii

Eric Bishop:

thing. No, no, no, to the to her.

Chuck Shute:

Because the thing I think, with Oprah is that she had a house like down the street from where this happened, or something. That's why people were saying like, and she closed off her gate or something and like, didn't like wasn't like, and I think I read this thing today about Hawaii. How like, a lot of the natives are basically being priced out of Hawaii. They can't afford it. And like they're from Hawaii. And so that's like a whole nother issue, which is like, kind of sad to me.

Liz Glazer:

Yeah,

Eric Bishop:

it's there right now actually, with his son. He's in Kohei. This week, but yeah, it's, it's and that's been happening for years and the property values have driven up and obviously, the cost of living is expensive there, because every fence has to either be grown or flown in.

Liz Glazer:

Except, you're I mean, I just remember from going there that they have Apple, I mean, bananas, the tastes like apples. Really? Yeah, they call them Apple bananas. And they're so good. What kind of witchcraft is that? It's just good and like, they're in volcanoes, Chuck, come on. But we're at I think that coconuts and Pineapples don't have to be you know, whatever it in. And so that's like, very plentiful and everything else is like a mill. million dollars, you know, like to

Eric Bishop:

take him back to what you said, Chuck, should they have given more? I mean, you're damned if you do damned if you don't. So if you only give $10 million? Well, why didn't you give 50 million 50 million? Why didn't they give 100 million they could afford to do it. So I think Liz is right, they should have just hired a PR person get punched in the face, so that they could have funded it and been like, hey, we support this venture, no one needs to know, we're funding it. Right? That's, and that's the sad part of society because people are afraid to put themselves out there. Especially if they're not. Not not that not equipped. Because I'd say Oprah and rocker probably equipped to deal with stuff. But it just to face the criticism that you do, because someone's always going to be out there throwing, you know, under the bus for doing good things. And that's probably the danger and the problem of living in a technology world where, you know, there's so much at people's fingertips that people have enough free time to sit there and just micro analyze, well, what's Liz doing with her life? I know, but that's, you know, that it's like, people have that. Yeah, within them to just dig apart other people, I think totally makes them feel better. But in the end, they're not feeling better. You know, they're just they have they have their own issues going on. And that's how they lash out to other people. Yeah.

Chuck Shute:

I just worry, I feel like there's a lot of people right now in America, and maybe the world that are just struggling, I don't know, like, I went, my mom, she's okay. But she was in the hospital, like, a couple weeks ago, and I went to the ER room. And it was just, it was so sad. There was just people that were there. And they were like, wailing and you know, they're just in pain and, and then I just, you know, you drive down the street, and there's homeless people. And I just feel like it's maybe I'm just more aware of all this stuff. Maybe there's always been terrible things in the world. But it seems like there's a lot more lately, like people are struggling. And I don't know what the solution is like, I feel like I want to do something. I feel like I'm very blessed in a lot of ways. But I feel like, what, how do we do like, because to me, to me, it seems like it's a lot of people who just, they just like, they don't have their lives together. There's there's a lack of ambition, and they're struggling with something and then they get wrapped up in the drugs or whatever. And then they just give up on life. And I don't know, it's like, I want to help people. But I don't even know how to help help people that are struggling. I think,

Liz Glazer:

chuck that you need to give $10 million

Eric Bishop:

money. Yeah, that's

Liz Glazer:

10 million and then give it away. Yeah. Well, but But I mean, to add a cheesy, maybe hopeful note, maybe, you know, 2024 is part of the answer. Like, I think you're right, there is a lot, that's terrible and wrong. And, you know, hope and hope in the future is like, the best thing that we have. I mean, it's kind of the only thing that we have. So, you know, maybe maybe next year is amazing.

Eric Bishop:

Well, I think a lot of it is how you life is what you make of it. And so not belittling what's going on with people that there's a homeless problem. There's a drug problem in our country, but I think people see in there, and I do it too. So it's not, you know, me not pontificating, but we see in our narrow little window of what life is. I study history, especially for some of the books I've done. And some other things, read about the depression, you know, go back even further and read about, you know, the Black Plague and all these things. So the hardships of humanity, have always been there. Now, they get accentuated because we're in a digital age where, you know, if Liz says something clever, or lissome says something controversial. The whole world could know about it in the matter of five minutes, or you know, whatever. It's, we have the capacity. It's like I was somewhere the other night. I was pulling out of my house, going to a grocery store or working out whatever, didn't have the kids that night, and my phone starts going crazy. I knew the sound because when it was it was an Amber Alert. And of course I look at it plus you have to look at it just to turn it off because you're driving. Now it's you know, years ago, if someone got kidnapped, you might hear about in the news a week later, if it even made national news. Well, now if there's a kidnapping, every person within you know, a four state radius is going to know they're driving a silver Nissan with a North Carolina play. And they look like Chuck, you know, we know we know what to look for Chuck now, Chuck, grab the kid. So yeah, it's I don't know it's it. Technology is an amazing thing. And I think it's made our lives better. But the flip side of that is it's also caused a lot of stress, anxiety and everything else because there's never quite there's very rarely quiet in any of our lives. Our lives are always noisy now. So that's I think it I think big pay Sure, we want to get back to where man, why are things so tough? We got to find a way to just not lose the technology. But we have the way of simplifying things. Maybe that might help. Chuck, figure out how to do that. For us. It was the 10 million and then figure the other problem. And

Chuck Shute:

now I'm getting into real serious stuff here. And so I don't want to put Liz on the spot. But yeah, this whole thing with like, and you can say, no comment, if you want. I totally respect that. But I mean, I guess I'm kind of naive, because I know there's obviously a lot of wars and things that go on with this whole thing with Hamas and Israel. And I have friends who are Muslim, I have friends who are Jewish. And you know, I just talked to a friend the other day, and her profile picture on Facebook was blacked out. And they said, Oh, why is your picture blackout? She's like, Oh, it's for Palestine, because we're not supposed to speak about it or something like that. I was like, well, that's terrible. But then I see also, I mean, just this, like anti semitic behavior. I mean, I don't know what else you would describe it as, I don't want to pick aside I want to support everywhere. And I feel like it's interesting, because I think about like the Vietnam War, and I wasn't obviously alive for that. But you look back at pictures, and it was like, the people were holding up signs, like peace signs, and like, you know, stop the war and all this. And now I feel like people were like, they want everyone to take a side like, are you on Israel or Palestine? And I just want peace. Is that Yeah. Say?

Liz Glazer:

No, I don't think it's crazy to say, first of all, I think it's hilarious that as you were saying, like, I don't want to put you on the spot. And if you have no comment, it's fine. And I 100% thought you were gonna ask me about Matt rife. And then you asked, you asked me about No, I don't know him. Personally. I know people who know him and like, you know, ran around similar circle. Yeah, sure. I mean,

Chuck Shute:

that's a great one.

Liz Glazer:

Subject. Yeah, no, no, no, but

Eric Bishop:

the mat, right.

Chuck Shute:

I noticed that like, because I look at the P I kind of like, want to know what your opinion is. And I kind of feel like I maybe I missed something like I look at your social media. And I'm like, What is Liz saying about this? Like, she's Jewish? Like, does she haven't? Like, what should I do? I don't know. I don't know what to do. So what do you

Liz Glazer:

think? Because yeah, yeah, totally. No, I'm happy to say,

Chuck Shute:

Yeah, with the whole, like, the college press, I think that's what really horrified me was seeing the college presidents not people are saying what they said or asking about, like the genocide of Jews, and the college presidents are not going Of course, we you know, denounced that, like, that is disgusting. And I was just going, my jaw was dropping, watching that I'm calling these are the people in charge of our higher education. It just confusing to me, am I missing? Like, I don't know, I don't

Liz Glazer:

know, I don't think you're missing something. I think that there's just a lot happening at the same time in terms of like, the flurry of news around it. And also, each side, you know, has a real distrust of the other. And also, this is like a really, really, really old conflict. And so that's the part that is so I am pro Israel, I, my grandparents are Zionist, like literally in 1948. And so, I have four out of four Holocaust survivor grandparents on both sides of my family. And so the, the desperate need for a homeland that's safe, is something that I've like, really felt in a visceral way from my entire life. I have family that's still in Israel, I have cousins in the reserves, you know, so it's all very near to my life and also to my heart. And, like, whenever, you know, it's like, it's, it's, of course, I want a ceasefire. I also and I, of course, I want peace, and maybe there isn't, and of course, like I do, and I recognize that like, what happened on October 7 was a really huge breach of a kind of security that stabilize this really unstable conflict and people living together, basically, not at war, but in a way that is like about to erupt for a long time. And I think also that like, you know, people who are close to Israel, and I don't purport to be like super close to Israel, but I've said my connections and, you know, I don't live there, obviously. But, you know, the idea of like, Israelis, criticizing the Israeli government had been happening for a really long time before this. And so it's not that like you I think there's a lot of conflating what is wrong, you know, because like there, I do believe that when people are anti Israel, that it gets to be anti semitic pretty quick and that it has in right now, and especially on college campuses, I think that that's, like, really scary. And if I had a kid in college, I'd be really, really scared. And I, you know, I mean, I can't even tell you how many antiSemitism WhatsApp chats I'm, I feel like I am in the FBI. Like, that's the level of like news alerts that I'm getting all the time. You know, Jewish kids who can't leave their dorm room who are, you know, hiding in the library, I think that was like a Cooper Union story. I mean, it's just like, you know, there's a lot of this stuff. And it's really, really scary, and it feels really imminent. And it feels like everything we've been taught to think is about to happen, because it happened to our grandparents. And I think that like, you know, without hostages coming home, the idea that like this could happen again, tomorrow is something that's very real. And so when, you know, I haven't, like joined Jewish voices for peace, for example, an organization that, you know, has a ceasefire goal, but hasn't kept like the return of the hostages. Top of mind, because for me, that is a real sticking point. And, you know, the people who I know, who are very pro Israel, that's their sticking point, I do know, a couple people who are very pro Israel in a way that I'm like, I don't think I believe that. In terms of, you know, there's a kind of like, we have to assert a kind of dominance and, and this is like, they're not even Israeli. It's just like people who I know who I'm like, huh, wow. Like, just because there's, you know, whenever there's a spectrum of opinions, you're gonna find people all along it. And that's definitely an outlier, but it's like a person I can think of. And most of the people who I know, who are pro Israel, who are anti anti semitism, who are Zionist and say they're Zionist, are not advocating for any kind of killing, it's a matter of Listen, like we don't, we don't want to die. We don't we don't want you to die. But like, don't step on us. You know, and it's it's that so that's my opinion on it.

Chuck Shute:

Okay, yeah, that makes a lot of sense. Yeah. I just wanted to know, and I need to hear from real people and not like talking heads on the news or whatever. So that's interesting. You for sure. Oh, yeah, of course. Yeah. Eric, do you have an opinion on this? Yeah.

Eric Bishop:

So I don't have the connection Liz has, but I definitely have been a student of history for years. I know a lot about that part of the world. Just I've had friends deployed over there, militarily and stuff. So I've actually my friend that I mentioned earlier, that's in Hawaii at the moment. He had recounted to me the other day where he was texting me while he was flying out there with his son. And he told me, he got a phone call. And so how do you get a phone call on a plane? He said, Well, it was through WhatsApp. And the guy that called him was a friend of his Evan, who I've met as well, who is Jewish and is in Jerusalem. And so he had been told me some stories, the last month of how, you know, when the when the sirens go off, they have to go to their bunker and just what life said like, so. Yeah, it's, it's hard because you know, you'd be a talking head and say, What's your opinion? Isn't your opinion doesn't matter. I'm for neither side killing each other. Yeah. From from one standpoint, from a security standpoint, when people come into your country, and massacre a whole lot of people. You don't just go hey, that sucks. Don't do that again. Of course, moss is 100% a terrorist organization. If your charter is out there, you can Google it and read the charter what they're there. The purpose of their charter is to annihilate Israel. Yeah, they want Israel to not be there anymore. Well, Israel has the right to be there as far as I care for us. Jerusalem wasn't a place they just made up and said, Hey, we're gonna go live in Jerusalem. Read history of seeing when Israel's lived in Jerusalem. It's been millennia. You know, I'm going a long time. Do Palestinians have the rights to be there? Sure. You I think you make an argument. So we find a way to coexist, not kill each other. And then it gets you know, then you start getting the well, should they do a ceasefire, should the hostages come back? And that's where it's out of my paygrade I do think Israel has to stand up for itself for sure. And just but but on the flip side, killing any innocent Palestinian, you know, the scary part of that, first of all, you can't justify it. I know Hamas is setting a lot of that up because Hey, we'll just put a bunch of our soldiers in a hospital in the basement. Right? Right. Well, how do you get rid of the soldiers without at least invading the hospital or doing something, so that that makes it really, really sticky fast. But it's just the one thing I will say, too. And then it's how to, once you kill one innocent person, how many of those family members of that innocent person and one of them get retribution. So that's where it almost becomes just lobbing missiles and bullets at each other indefinitely. There's gotta be a way to stop it. I'm not smart enough to figure out what that is. But I know laying down your arms and saying, okay, don't do that again. Yeah.

Liz Glazer:

And that's Yeah, I think that's really well said, Eric. And that's the tricky part. And it's also like, you know, Israel has, and I know, you know, the US has also funded part of this, which is like something that people are up in arms about, but there's a lot of defense that Israel has. So the Iron Dome, you know, I read somewhere the other day, I don't know if you saw this, but like that, you know, the number of Hamas rockets that have been intercepted is like, you know, in the 10s of 1000s, like some crazy number, where it's like,

Eric Bishop:

1000s. Yes. Yeah. So,

Liz Glazer:

you know, it's a question also of like, okay, well, what are you funding? And is the casualty differential, a function of that rather than like either side? Warring actively? Yeah. Yeah.

Chuck Shute:

Yeah, it's just, it's such a, and maybe too, it's like, it goes back to what you were saying before Eric, about the technology, because I feel like before a few years ago, like I just kind of had my head in the sand and I didn't know about it. I'm sure there's been tons of wars that have been going on, and I just didn't know about it. But now I feel like it's with, uh, with Twitter and Instagram, and all this stuff, like a tick tock. I mean, I'm seeing the footage. And it's just horrifying. I mean, and just in, like I said, even the college presidents there take in the stuff that's going on in America, the protests and things are, it's like you said, Liz, it's like, it's scary. And I'm not Jewish. I mean, I'm just, I'm scared for Jewish people. I'm like, I don't like that. I don't want to be I don't want anyone to feel unsafe in America. Especially.

Liz Glazer:

You know, it's also, you know, I also am sensitive, like, there were those Muslim I think it was like three boys who, who died in Michigan. Is that right? Something happened. But it was also like, I'm always Yeah, it was for

Chuck Shute:

911. It was like people just like, grab would grab a Middle Eastern person, or something like that, somehow.

Liz Glazer:

I mean, yeah, I just, I just want to say, you know, that that like, I mean, I don't want anyone to die. And, yeah, I think like, one of the things that I guess bothers me about some of the opinions that are around, like, on social media is just like, one thing I know, is that I don't know how to solve the Middle East peace crisis. Like, it's definitely beyond what I know how to do. And so the idea of, like, you know, people I know who are like, we have to do it this way. I'm like, I'm not saying that, you know, Netanyahu is a perfect guy, or, like, I'm not saying that anybody is like, amazing in this fight, but I definitely know that I'm not going to solve it. So the idea of like, again, everybody deserves the right to speak their opinion, etc. But sometimes I'm just like, what, like, I don't I don't know how you are so certain that the information that you're getting is correct, that you know, whatever's happening in the way that you see it and that this is the solution. I don't know I find that kind of arrogance to be off putting especially in the kind of conflict that this is which is really old and really deep.

Eric Bishop:

Yeah, yeah. Going and threatening Israeli Jewish students in a college university. Or you know, anything that's a couple years Yeah, that's the

Chuck Shute:

thing that bothers me the most is just I think most people whether you're Israeli or Palestine or whatever, like you're just trying to get by you're just trying to pay your bills whether you live there you live in America or whatever, like most people are just trying to get by and it sucks that they're getting caught in the middle of this. The people that are up top the leaders that are making these decisions to attack or not attack and and now they're getting caught in the crossfire and it's just like, I don't know, I don't like seeing that. I feel like most people will probably all in the same page, we probably all want peace because we want to just be able to get home to our families and be safe and not have to worry about getting shot or murder or bombed or any of those things.

Liz Glazer:

Yeah, I mean, I guess the only footnote to that is like, when you are a terrorist organization, you might not. And so that's like the part of it. That's trickier to fight against.

Chuck Shute:

Yeah. Yeah. But it's important, too, that I feel like speaking up, I feel like if more people spoke up, and yeah, I mean, I feel like right now, it's like the loudest people are the, the crazy people that I'm scared. Sure. Nobody's saying anything. So that's one reason I bring it up just to get that out there and just feel like okay, I'm glad we're all kind of on the same page. It seems like, I'm sure most people are, I hope.

Liz Glazer:

Yeah, I think so too. And then, you know, sometimes like the effect of social media is like an amplify certain opinions and voices. And that can be scary, if that's what you're seeing all

Eric Bishop:

the algorithms feed off that like, like Facebook, I mean, there's been documented, there's been documented proof of that, where Facebook, you know, if they know what your interests are based on, you know, different websites to go to and all that. So then you'll just start getting feeds from people that are saying, down with Israel, or you know, or we're pro Palestine or whatever, we're pro Israel, you'll get that. It's like tick tock because that tick tock will just feed you exactly and it also then feed in of like, the negative about sides that you might, you know, take issue with, and they'll just make amplify it and tick tock or WhatsApp,

Chuck Shute:

you guys both have tick tock

Eric Bishop:

Liz dances on tick tock every day, I watch her videos.

Liz Glazer:

I have it I rarely engage with it, but maybe more in 2024

Eric Bishop:

I happen I post stuff for books. I can't imagine it's actually sold a book yet, but I saw I'll put something out once a day or once every few days, and I'll get you know, a couple 100 People like I guess view it and does that make you sold a book? Probably not. So

Chuck Shute:

is that something you see? I worry about all this shit. I worry about way too much. I worry about like, I have tick tock too. And I'm like, Oh, is this like people say it's Chinese spyware? And then like, remember that? That's another big story of the year was like the Chinese spy balloon and stuff like are you guys worried about came near

Eric Bishop:

my house? I shot I had it. I was thinking of it. My neighbor said he was going to Yes, it came to the Carolinas Yes.

Liz Glazer:

So what is it spy on?

Chuck Shute:

They said it was just a weather balloon. Okay. I don't

Eric Bishop:

see a bunch of Southerners sunbathing naked in their backyards.

Chuck Shute:

I have friends that say, oh, China's gonna do like an EMP and they're gonna and I'm like, no, because I think we're like their best customers. So like, why would you like do something damage your best combo

Eric Bishop:

then I'll literally in $0 Chuck, I don't think they're gonna fry us because they're not gonna get

Chuck Shute:

now Russia that might be a little bit different. I don't know. But yeah, it just feels like it's a weird time right now. It feels like we're kind of at the end of America almost like it feels like the end of the Roman civilization. Like if Eric You know, history like, Isn't there some parallels between the end of the Roman civilization and Air America right now? republics

Eric Bishop:

normally don't last too many hundreds of years. Put it that way? Ah, yes,

Chuck Shute:

I hope that we can just my friend always says like, this is this whole thing. It's a house of cards. It's held up with duct tape. I just need to last another 50 years, and then I'll be dead.

Eric Bishop:

I just need to have a couple books hit and get a movie deal. And I combined my island in the South Pacific and everyone's welcome to calm as long as they pass the vetting process. Great.

Chuck Shute:

How hard is it to get? I mean, your book is doing well. Right? I mean, is it? Is it pretty hard to get a book deal movie deal with it from a book? Like what is the percentage? Or do you even look at that?

Eric Bishop:

Very low? Well, yeah, it's very low. I've not done much with it. I'm actually supposed to get the rights back to the first book soon, especially going back six months ago, and the publisher never did what he said. So it's supposed to now be this month. So nothing's ever been done for the movie rights. I'll probably pursue that next year because I have some connections, loose connections. That's kind of like the big you know, that's the big elephant in the room. People think oh, if I just get a write a book and or whatever your creative never is, but if you write a book and I get a movie deal, then I'm you know, I'm gonna be sitting in Fiji you know, you know, drinking Bud Light and enjoying life. Like you're lucky and I'm sure Liz can talk about it on the comedy side. You're lucky if you get some money on your first movie deal and you might get money for your book, but you're not going to get a lot chances are and you get more when it gets greenlit which so you'll they'll give you money for a book and the body ban was my first book. So a production company is interested in it. They'll say hey, we want to give you X amount of dollars. As for the rights to produce something, yay, great. Are they actually going to produce it? Right? Right? Very, very, very, very few that ever

Chuck Shute:

just covering their bases just in case it does blow up. Yeah. Or they

Eric Bishop:

want to, or they find they find something they like that they think they're going to produce. They'll buy all the other books that are around that type of story, to keep other production companies from producing. It's like, this is house, everything's House of Cards. There's comedy House of Cards, there's Hollywood house cards, there's book publishing, and everything's I hold a big house of cards. So yes, you

Chuck Shute:

would last, we talked about this last time on my episode with you is that you were saying that anything that's like really goal driven success, you're not super into that, because it reminded you of when you worked at the law firm. And so you haven't really you're not pursuing things like aggressively you just want to do comedy. And just like you're happy just doing comedy, what you're doing right now?

Liz Glazer:

Yeah, I mean, I think there is truth to that. And I'm also like, trying to get over some of it, you know, just because I think, get over the association to like a past life. And the idea that just because it's about, I don't know, increasing an Instagram following that it doesn't have to be inherently evil, you know, I just want to continue to be me. And I do have friends who have been able to be like, you know, really successful and seemingly continue to, like, do the things that they want to do to be creatively driven and independent. But that's, that is really important to me. So it's something that I continue to, I guess, wrestle with, like,

Chuck Shute:

how many shows are you still doing? It seems like whenever you post your tour dates, or whatever you're doing, like so many shows, it's a lot shows a week or something, right?

Liz Glazer:

Oh, yeah, no, totally. It's a lot. But, and it's only going to be more because like, I'm I have like, I've never done a headlining tour, but I will, in early 2024. I want to because I knew you were going to ask which I so love and appreciate. But it's not on the list. Now. It's not to say that it can't get there. I just don't know anyone in Phoenix, other than you. So at this

Eric Bishop:

point, sell a show out for Trump.

Liz Glazer:

I mean, listen, I've done shows where I basically no one person and then like, have sold out a show because of that. But basically, at this point, like I booked the whole tour myself, I have raps but the I actually did this before I did. And so it's all based on like, I featured at a club and did well and like got off stage. And the guy who owns the club is like, we're gonna have you headline and I'm like, great. That's one weekend. And it's just like a number of those to get to a tour. And I don't I don't know anyone in Phoenix, yet. So that's where I'm at with it.

Chuck Shute:

Okay, I'll try to make some connections for you. Like, meeting here, I don't know if he would have any power or anything. Like you need to know the club owners or other comedians, or,

Liz Glazer:

um, I think it could be other comedians, because I I'm not like a snob in terms of like, what I'll headline, you know, because as long as I get to do the hour, then I will go

Chuck Shute:

on your email the club owner and be like, Hey, can I come into your comedy club? And then you can and they will not write you back? But no, podcast guests. I just email people. And it's like, usually it is a no, but like, every once in a while people say,

Liz Glazer:

Yeah, well, I think it's like with comedy club owners, you know. And this, I just want to be sensitive number one to time. And number two, two news items. And we mentioned Matt rife, and so I feel like that right is a good thing. I mean, to the extent it's news, you know, he announced a huge door, and he's a very controversial figure in comedy now.

Chuck Shute:

Because he commented he talks shit to some six year old girl is that what happened? That happened? Yeah. Like some girl like trolls, I don't know if he knew really girl was only six years old. But she said some comment and made fun of him or something. And he said, your mom buys tickets to my show with her only fans money or something like that. And then it came out it was he was he was talking shit to a six year old girl. So that the controversy or was there something else? I

Liz Glazer:

don't know. I guess it's maybe like comedians on comedians, but like the controversy being like, you know, number one, I think he had this like, really misogynistic A joke in his Netflix special and then a lot of comedians are just like he shouldn't have gotten a Netflix special and then are like, see, it's not that good, or I didn't watch it. So I really don't have an opinion because I didn't watch it. And I'd heard

Chuck Shute:

of it too. It's because he's really good looking and grow like him. Yeah,

Liz Glazer:

I guess I mean, you know, like, he's not my type. So I. Yeah, but like, he's

Eric Bishop:

not that good looking.

Chuck Shute:

That's the the critique of him is that he's just a good looking guy. And so and like, there's probably some female comedians that have the same critique. They say, Oh, she got the specialty question is a hot chick. And but I

Liz Glazer:

think I think actually, I mean, yeah, that is part of it. But I actually think like, at least the the comedians are like, he is really good with these, like crowd work clips, but like, Can he really sustain an hour? And I guess, I don't know what the literal consensus is, but like, as far as my algorithmic feed, seems to suggest the answer to that would be a no. But again, I didn't watch it. So normally, yeah.

Eric Bishop:

I've seen his clips and that's how I knew who he was. And I know people that have bought his bought tickets to go see him. I think they're going to the Richmond show. I did start watching the Netflix special because I I don't watch tons of comedy, but I watch a bunch of them. And you know, yeah, Chappelle is my favorite has always been my favorite. I love Dave Chappelle. People. I know very controversial and some for sure. But comedians job is to make people laugh. I don't and I don't really see it as there being like, too many lines to that your job is to elicit a lot some people are gonna think it's funny, some is not. Yeah, I only Well, I don't know how long this special is for Matt. I'm assuming it's an hour. Most of them are Yes. Yeah. I think I made it like 15 minutes. And I was like, it was boring. Because if he said that I saw an interview with him a couple months, maybe a month or so back. And he said, Oh, my my, my specials that my special is not crowd work. And that's what people are coming to expect. But that's not all I do. Right. But I think that's going to disappoint a lot of people because the crowd work whether you like it or not. It's what it's what's created this mystique about him. Yeah.

Liz Glazer:

So Right. That was,

Chuck Shute:

I think a really good at crowd work. To my favorite comedian Sam Morell. I don't know if you know him and Tim Dylan. Those guys are just like, they're just funny people. Like, if you were just like, went to like dinner with them. It would be you'd be laughing your ass off the whole time. Yeah,

Liz Glazer:

sure. Yeah, totally. Yeah. So anyway, I just brought it back there, because it's a news item. But for my tour personally, you know, I've had experiences at clubs, and I have a date to tape my next hour. So I was like, Okay, I'm gonna create a tour leading up to the taping. And so that's kind of like my beginning of 2024. Hopefully, that's the plan. And so, you know, in the next couple of weeks, I have like a poster that's going to reveal the tour dates that, you know, it's not a video and Ashton Kutcher, his house, or whatever it was with that, right. But it's, it's like my tour. But

Chuck Shute:

that's so cool that you're doing it, you're doing the dream. I mean, yeah, we're all doing what we love. I mean, writing books, doing podcasts. And, you know, it's definitely we're not at that Taylor Swift level yet. But I mean, it's fun to do these things. And that's why I do it. I'm not trying to, I mean, of course, it would be nice to have that level of success. But I really like just doing podcasts, I've always will

Eric Bishop:

do what you like, in life. I mean, so much of life is a lot of times what you have to do to get by, but man, you better find some stuff that you enjoy, if you can find it as a career. Really great pursue that. But and I mean, you know, and that's the

Chuck Shute:

biggest problem going back to what not to get, like all depressing, but I feel like that is the biggest issue in America. I feel like there's too many people that are lost. And if they found something, not everybody can be a Taylor Swift or whatever. But like if they found something that they could, you know, look forward to each day. I feel like there's a lot of people that are just lost, and I would love for people to find that because I feel like I found that I'm like, Oh, I finally I finally found something I'm good at. And now I want everyone else to find their thing. Whatever that is. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah, me too. How much do you have to go live? Sorry, I know Yeah. To time. Yeah,

Liz Glazer:

I do. I so loved getting to talk to you. I always do. And Eric, you too. Like really?

Eric Bishop:

Yeah. Let me know if you're gonna do a career. Are you in the South? I'm about an hour outside of Charlotte. Okay.

Liz Glazer:

All right. I don't have I have a couple of North Carolina dates but not Charlotte.

Eric Bishop:

Okay. So if you ever come towards Asheville, I'm like I'm Oh, triangle between Asheville Charlotte and Greenville, South Carolina. I'm like, right. And get all spots in an hour. That's

Chuck Shute:

helpful. And how close are you coming to Phoenix? I mean, are you going to go to like Tucson or Vegas or LA or maybe I'll just can't

Unknown:

get Chuck Oh, No,

Liz Glazer:

no. La I will tell you yeah de la but but also like we can work on you know getting I will come to you, you know, we should we should meet after all of this virtual time. Yeah,

Chuck Shute:

it would be cool. Do you find this? I've seen your obviously I've seen videos and listen to yeah be cool to see you live. Give me a hug.

Liz Glazer:

Yes, I would love that. And you too, Eric.

Eric Bishop:

Thank you Liz. I did go to the comedy cellar this year actually. Oh, really? Yeah, I was up in I saw I came up to New York to see Bano. He was doing a show his about his book, actually. But so I got out of that. And I'm in the city by myself. And I've been in the city a ton of times. So very comfortable city. And I'm like, and I don't feel like going back to the hotel hotels. Right. And I was so I, I went down to what's the East Village are these village and I just went and got the line and we got I got 1am or 2am show whatever it was. Great. fabulous experience. Yeah.

Chuck Shute:

It's awesome. Well, thanks, guys. I'll get you up. And I thank you for Thank you. Yeah, happy holidays. To you have any Christmas

Liz Glazer:

add to you. Good

Eric Bishop:

job with your year Chuck. Good. 2023 Roundup. Yes. Kill it and 2020 for

Chuck Shute:

all of us. All of us. Yes. Thank you. Figuratively not

Eric Bishop:

literally. Right. Thanks. Bye. Thank you.

Chuck Shute:

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