Chuck Shute Podcast

Rob Carlyle (The Compulsions)

August 25, 2020 Robert Carlyle Season 2 Episode 52
Chuck Shute Podcast
Rob Carlyle (The Compulsions)
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Chuck Shute Podcast
Rob Carlyle (The Compulsions)
Aug 25, 2020 Season 2 Episode 52
Robert Carlyle

Episode #52:  Robert Carlyle from The Compulsions calls in to talk about his new album "Ferocious' which features guitarist Earl Slick (John Lennon, David Bowie), Bumblefoot (Guns N' Roses), Alec Morton (Raging Slab) and Brian Delaney (New York Dolls). 

0:00:00 - Intro
0:01:33 - Rob's Influences & Growing Up in NYC
0:04:45 - Learning to Play Guitar
0:07:51 - "Crazy" Rob Carlyle
0:10:25 - "The Compulsions" 
0:11:48 - Confused With Other People 
0:13:58 - Richard Fortus & Frank Ferrer 
0:16:05 - Axl Rose & Duff McKagan 
0:20:05 - Compulsions Fired Richard & Frank
0:24:24 - Ron "Bumblefoot" Thal
0:25:55 - Touring, Festivals & Rock Cruises 
0:28:29 - Earl Slick's Advice From David Bowie
0:31:10 - Alec Morton & Brian Delaney 
0:34:20 - New Album "Ferocious"
0:43:16 - Being Inspired To Write Songs
0:47:15 - Becoming a Better Guitar Player 
0:48:40 - Jimmy Ashhurst of Buckcherry 
0:52:03 - Sleazy Rock Image 
0:54:55 - Getting Songs Licensing 
0:55:50 - Future Plans 
0:58:15 - World Resource Institute 
1:00:22 - Wrap Up 

Support the show (https://venmo.com/Chuck-Shute)

Show Notes Transcript

Episode #52:  Robert Carlyle from The Compulsions calls in to talk about his new album "Ferocious' which features guitarist Earl Slick (John Lennon, David Bowie), Bumblefoot (Guns N' Roses), Alec Morton (Raging Slab) and Brian Delaney (New York Dolls). 

0:00:00 - Intro
0:01:33 - Rob's Influences & Growing Up in NYC
0:04:45 - Learning to Play Guitar
0:07:51 - "Crazy" Rob Carlyle
0:10:25 - "The Compulsions" 
0:11:48 - Confused With Other People 
0:13:58 - Richard Fortus & Frank Ferrer 
0:16:05 - Axl Rose & Duff McKagan 
0:20:05 - Compulsions Fired Richard & Frank
0:24:24 - Ron "Bumblefoot" Thal
0:25:55 - Touring, Festivals & Rock Cruises 
0:28:29 - Earl Slick's Advice From David Bowie
0:31:10 - Alec Morton & Brian Delaney 
0:34:20 - New Album "Ferocious"
0:43:16 - Being Inspired To Write Songs
0:47:15 - Becoming a Better Guitar Player 
0:48:40 - Jimmy Ashhurst of Buckcherry 
0:52:03 - Sleazy Rock Image 
0:54:55 - Getting Songs Licensing 
0:55:50 - Future Plans 
0:58:15 - World Resource Institute 
1:00:22 - Wrap Up 

Support the show (https://venmo.com/Chuck-Shute)

Chuck Shute :

Welcome to the Chuck Shute Podcast. My guest today is Rob Carlisle from the band that compulsions. So this is like a really critically acclaimed New York City ban. And he's had he's worked with some really good musicians in this band. He had the current guitarist and current drummer from Guns and Roses Richard fordism. Frank for were in the compulsions for a long time, but he fired them and we'll talk a little bit about that. And now he's assembled this great set of musicians for his new album ferocious. So this includes Earl slick, who's a guitarist who's worked with john lennon and David Bowie, so pretty good resume there. Plus he got bumblefoot, another guitarist who's also in Guns and Roses. And now we friends the 80s band Asia. So great musician great songs on Rob's new album ferocious and Rob is just a really cool guy. It was really fun to talk music with him and get his thoughts on a lot of this stuff with music and what's gone on the world and songwriting and all sorts of stuff. So I really hope he can get a tour together soon because I'd love to see him live. Otherwise, I might have to make a trip to New York City. And I can see his band and I can see some of the comedians I've interviewed like Mike Kaplan and Liz Meili, and Dan Wilber and all that whole gang. So enjoy this interview with Rob Carlisle from the compulsions. Welcome to my show. Thanks for reaching out. It's exciting. I guess my first thing I got to ask you, I don't know. I couldn't find a lot about your background. I know you're from New York. But you'll have to fill in the gaps for me. I mean, I know a little bit. You're a fan of Led Zeppelin, the Rolling Stones. And I thought this was cool that you used to read interviews with Jimmy Page and Keith Richards and they would mention like these old blues guys like Robert Johnson, and then you would go back and like find those things that they were influenced Because you were such a fan?

Unknown Speaker :

Oh, yeah, definitely. I mean, I don't know how I wouldn't have done that. Yeah, I mean,

Rob Carlyle :

oh, you know, I love the blues and folk music and all that kind of stuff. And, you know, I always say that to people, you know, like, if you're really into playing guitar or being a musician or whatever, I mean, obviously, you're gonna have your heroes, but they have their heroes too. And you kind of owe it to yourself and the music, you know, you know, look into it. I mean, you're probably gonna love what you hear. And you'll be like, Oh, that's what they got that from, you know what I mean? Right. Right. So that's kind of how you got into music. So tell me, but tell me more about your your background, like growing up in New York. What was that? Like? Um, well, I'm a child of the 70s. Um, it was way different than although it's becoming more like that now. Um, uh, you know, it just things were just a lot different. You know, I mean, I was born in Staten Island, so After about the age of 10 we moved upstate so I didn't really have a lot of exposure to the quote unquote the city except for the odd trip here you know here and there were like traveling through it as we went to go visit you know, relatives in Brooklyn. But and so the radio up there was I was what I mean now they call it classic rock. Yeah. Um, so it was all the usual suspects, you know, the stones and the Zeppelin and Dylan and Hendrix and Aerosmith, and AC DC and all that. And I just loved all that stuff. I never thought you know, that I would ever, you know, play guitar or try and be in a band or anything. I just liked it, for whatever reason, it just appealed to me. Um, and then, uh, you know, after high school, I moved into the city and started going to art school and hanging out in the clubs and meet other, you know, new whole new cast the friends and that's when I learned a lot more about the bands.

Unknown Speaker :

I read about, like the Stooges and the dolls and stuff because that's the thing get a lot of that's the thing get a lot of exposure. And you know, you wouldn't hear the New York Dolls on the radio and you still pretty much don't, unfortunately. Um, so So I guess the combination of you know that kind of, you know, classic rock upbringing for lack of a better term and then you know, once I hit town and then got hip to like, you know, the Sex Pistols and and the clash and all that kind of in the class was on the radio, actually, but you want to hurt the Sex Pistols and the dolls and the Stooges and that kind of dead boys? Certainly. Yeah, no, those are all great influences. but so did you. When did you start like playing the guitar and singing and writing songs? Oh, well, playing guitar. I you know, I saw a movie on HBO. It was called um, let's spend the night together. And it was a stone's throw. Announcer movie and and when I saw them in action, you know, I had never seen the visual really, you know, up until that point. And so when I saw them in action as a little kid, I was like, that just looks like and sounds like the coolest thing ever. So I wanted to get a guitar. And, and so I was probably maybe like 12 or 13 when I got my parents to get me a guitar and took a few lessons and, you know, you know, just, you know, kind of taught myself after

Chuck Shute :

yourself. Okay, so no lessons or I feel lessons

Unknown Speaker :

too much I should I should have taken a lot more but really, and to this day, I'm really not into like learning other people's material. Okay, and I don't like what they do when you know, and it's a great way to learn how to play Actually, I mean, there's really no other way but I'm just, I never was I never loved playing all the learning other people's material. Um, but I love the songs that they had written.

Rob Carlyle :

So I guess I guess I just aspired to like write songs, quote, unquote, like them, you know? Okay. And then eventually, you know, I used to buy all the guitar magazines. Oh, yeah, me too. I still have them actually, um, you don't throw those out, you know, at least I didn't. And so that's a cool article. Yeah, there was an article in there about the Keith Richards open G tuning. And so I put my guitar in that tuning. And I was and it sounded amazing to me. And I immediately changed it back to regular tuning, because I didn't think it was right. So you know, rip off somebody Little did I know that you know, everything is ripped off, right? Yeah. To a degree. Yeah. Yeah. So, yeah, I use the word ripped off, but you know what I mean, um,

Unknown Speaker :

you know, eventually I would go back to it and, and, and in the early days, you know, I mostly played, you know, in open tuning, a very, you know, very crude player, you know, it's still to this day, Although I'm working on that, and and I try making bands in the city once I moved to the city and didn't really have any luck, I was looking for a lead singer. I was looking for like the next Steven Tyler or whatever, Ella, Steve Marriott or something like that. And I just wasn't having any luck. And after a while, I bought a Ford track, learn how to, you know, kind of use that and started making like these makeshift demos and writing my own songs. And, you know, and I became, you know, I still I was singing on them if you could call it singing. And and what

Chuck Shute :

style would you say it was back then? Was it kind of what you're playing now? Or is it more punker?

Unknown Speaker :

Totally, totally. The same thing is now okay. Like I've been on this path. I've been on this mission like the whole time.

Chuck Shute :

So when did you get the name crazy Rob Carlisle and why is it crazy?

Unknown Speaker :

I just did that. Um, why did I do that?

Chuck Shute :

Oh, you gave it to yourself.

Unknown Speaker :

Yeah. Everybody treats me like that. That sounds like Alright, fine, I'm gonna own it. Okay. So I did that I did this tour a couple of years ago, I did a couple of tours with this guy named Daryl bath. Mmm hmm. He's a British guy. And we're very similar and, you know, influences and you said

Chuck Shute :

he's the British you right?

Unknown Speaker :

Well, that's good. I say that. Yeah. We're very similar. Okay. And in our, in our, in our likes and in, in our songwriting style and even vocally and stuff. So we were really good match. And, and so, we were putting that together, I think, I think this is how that happened. And I just wanted to say I just wanted to use my name, but I wanted it to be like attention getting you know, in in, you know, in posters or whatever. So, I just put that name in front of it as a as a fuck you to everybody who treats me like I'm crazy. I'm like, okay, fine, then I'm gonna own it. And then and then just as a way to just stand out. I mean, why don't we change our names and rock and roll you know? Like, why is my waters, Muddy Waters, you know, because you're probably more likely to press play than in, you know, instead of McKinley morganfield, which was his real name, right. But he was just

Chuck Shute :

Yeah, like slash is definitely a better name than Saul Hudson. Yeah,

Unknown Speaker :

yeah. Yeah. So I mean, you kind of you kind of have the right to change your name in this business, and, you know, you might as well just go for it. Um, so, so there was that and also, I had also written a bunch of songs, which no one's really heard too much of yet. Although I did play a couple of them on that tour. I written a couple of songs that were kind of about like your mental state of mind. Your mental that's redundant, um, but um, if one was called my baby's driving me crazy, which is an awesome song. I have another song called suicide blues, which believe it or not, is hilarious. Okay, another song called arm reclusive. And those are waiting to get put out one day and they're all about you know, they were more about like, You're headspace. And so that was another reason why the crazy thing just kind of came about. So it's just kind of like, you know, I don't do anything for really one reason there's always like a host of reasons. Okay. All my moves and I probably if you ask anybody, we're all we're all like that. Um, so yeah, that's where the crazy came from and then what how'd you get what's happening? I don't know if I'm gonna use it moving forward, but who knows. Okay,

Chuck Shute :

so how did you come up with the name that compulsions? That's pretty good name because it's kind of like obsessive compulsive. A lot of like mental things. I'm noticing a theme.

Unknown Speaker :

Yeah, there is there's a lot of there's actually a lot of themes. Mental one, I mean, look, listen, Ozzy Osbourne has a whole career based on crazy right and evil, but also crazy. Yeah, true. Oh, you know, so it's, it's, um, it's a it's a wellspring of inspiration. Um, so what was the question? How did

Chuck Shute :

you come up with the name, the compulsions? I,

Unknown Speaker :

you know, I was surrounded by that time, like I'm telling you when I was, you know, trying to put together a band or putting together bands that didn't last very long I had a posted on a refrigerator of just like, um you know, possible names, okay. And I always loved bands that are like the blanks like, boys or the New York Dolls or whatever, I'll always love the buffing. And I like that word because you know, it's a word that you don't really hear that much. So it's, it's kind of like not like a tired word. And it kind of reminds me of the temptations, which is like another great name. Yeah, I like I like the T IO n or the S IO n ending. Okay. Sounds cool. So that's kind of really what it was about. And you know, the name is just kind of stuck. And yeah, that's kind of it.

Chuck Shute :

That's cool. So do you ever get confused with the actor Robert Carlyle? Because when I was googling you, I kept finding coming across this actor I was like, I got a scroll through the story. How Don't you need to get like a your name to be the top Google search or

Unknown Speaker :

I'm working on that I'm actually I get confused for everybody. But not that guy like actually I've heard people have told me I look like everybody and I mean everybody from the Beatles to Motley Crue and believe it or not, I, yesterday I'm sitting there and some crazy dude just walks up to me and goes yo, what's going on Alice Cooper? You know

Chuck Shute :

what you're a little too young to be honest Coover.

Unknown Speaker :

I think they just throw out any rock and roll reference. Okay, that comes to mind You know, I've heard I've heard I mean, just a bizarre list of names that would that actually blow you I've even got I've got an Elvis Elvis Presley and Michael Jackson even. I mean from complete foreigners just like throwing out like any kind of the first musical name they could think of. Okay, interesting. Like Put it back to them, you know?

Chuck Shute :

So it's more just like they're saying not necessarily thinking you're that person but just calling you that as like a nickname because Cuz, I guess yeah, like, yeah, people in New York is that kind of a New York thing to two people in New York. Like I remember I was wearing this, like a Brooklyn Dodgers old jersey and someone's like, hey, Brooklyn, come here, and he's trying to sell me something. Like they just kind of call you what, like, they don't know your name. So you're, they're gonna say what you look like or,

Unknown Speaker :

yeah, New York has to speak their mind for better or worse, you know, they're just gonna you they're just gonna let you know exactly what they think of you. If they feel like it. Um, is that do I like it necessarily? I mean, probably not. But, you know, I could be called worse. So,

Chuck Shute :

yeah, no, that's that's not really an insult if you call Alice Cooper's a on the other than he's a little bit older than you are a lot older than you.

Unknown Speaker :

I think it was just I think it was just, you know, if you saw the guy that called me on was Cooper, that would probably explain a lot. Okay. He was definitely a crazy motherfucker. Okay. But he was just speaking his mind. And that was the first thing that came out of his mouth. Gotcha. So that I didn't take it as an insult. No, definitely not. So

Chuck Shute :

you've had the compulsion since What? 2003 17 years?

Unknown Speaker :

Yeah, yeah don't mind me. Yeah.

Chuck Shute :

Okay. No but so this is so cool you actually originally you had the Guns and Roses guitarist Richard Fortus and their drummer Frank Ferrer, which you knew them from like when you played in New York and so I was I was trying to figure out the story, but you actually had them before they were in Guns and Roses and then at one point was like mid recording or something that he's like Richards like told you like oh, yeah, I'm By the way, I'm gonna be in Guns and Roses.

Rob Carlyle :

You definitely did your research.

Chuck Shute :

Yeah.

Rob Carlyle :

Yeah, that's the story right there. I'm glad I don't have to tell it but yeah, that's the story. Um, yeah.

Chuck Shute :

And at first then Frank, he wasn't but then he joined later. So is Axl just like stealing your your musical band members or is it because he knew Richard or how did Frank get in later?

Rob Carlyle :

Yeah, I don't know what's going on with that guy. But it certainly feels like it.

Chuck Shute :

That's crazy. So did they have to get like permission from Axl to still be in your band as well or because they they didn't quit your bandwidth they were as they were simultaneously in you your band and Guns and Roses. Right?

Rob Carlyle :

Did they have to get permission? That's a really good question. I do not know the answer to that.

Chuck Shute :

But they were in both bands for a while, right?

Rob Carlyle :

But I mean, yeah, yeah, yeah. Yeah. I mean, they were they've been in there when every First of all, everybody's in a million bands these days.

Chuck Shute :

True. Yeah.

Rob Carlyle :

Oh, and that was kind of the beginning of that, uh, that, you know, the early 2000s all of a sudden, like everybody was in a million bands. So

Chuck Shute :

because they had to be they couldn't sell records anymore, right?

Rob Carlyle :

You had to like, exactly, yeah. Yeah. So I don't know. I don't know the inner workings of that camp. I don't know what conversations are had. Um, but it's a good question.

Chuck Shute :

So you don't so yeah, I don't know if you listen to my show. But I had, I don't know if you know, Troy Patrick for a while he's, he's been in a bunch of bands, but he's in a band with dizzy Reed. And so one time he told me the story about how he went to a party, and it was Axl Rose, Sebastian Bach, and it was like, I don't have either the king or the prince of India. This is crazy story I was like, so I had asked like, did you ever get a chance? Did you ever meet Axl? Do you have an Axl Rose story? Because you had his band members in your band. I mean, they must have gotten you backstage once or twice, right?

Rob Carlyle :

Yeah. I have been backstage. I was backstage. I guess when they played the garden one time, and I was backstage, another time in Italy. I've never had any interaction directly with the guy. So I don't really I'm gonna disappoint you. And I don't know. He did come in... now that I think of it when it was the Garden Show. And, I have to say the backstage atmosphere was nothing like what I thought it was going to be and it's nothing like what my backstage atmosphere would be like, I would certainly have llamas and lesbians everywhere. Very, it was very um, it was it was very well lit and you know, it, and friends and families and moms and it was very PG affair.

Chuck Shute :

Okay.

Rob Carlyle :

Not to blow their image, but why not?

Chuck Shute :

Um, well, no, but I mean, I think it was different in the 80s then now, I mean, now they're a little older. They can't.

Rob Carlyle :

Let's hope so.

Chuck Shute :

Oh, I guarantee it. Yeah, no, I'm sure there's some crazier story. So then do you have interactions with Slash or Duff or any of the other guys?

Unknown Speaker :

um,

Chuck Shute :

Really?

Rob Carlyle :

I've never met Slash, but I've been introduced to Duff once. And actually, I didn't want to meet him because I don't really like meeting these people to be honest.

Unknown Speaker :

Really?

Rob Carlyle :

Yeah. I had to be cajoled into it. Like Yeah, I was asked repeatedly. And I went over there and sure enough, he was at if I remember correctly, you know what it was. It was at Manitoba is which is doesn't exist anymore, but it's this punk rock bar on Avenue D, and he a friend introduced me and he was actually sitting there next to a couple of other Seattle guys in rock and roll, the Pearl Jam guy he's friends with Yeah. Is it Mike McCready?

Chuck Shute :

Stone Gossard maybe?

Unknown Speaker :

right and that price is

Rob Carlyle :

The guitar player from Alice In Chains-

Chuck Shute :

Jerry Cantrel?

Rob Carlyle :

Yeah, yeah, it was the three of them was sitting there. And and I was, you know, honestly, I didn't really it was kind of awkward and I just said hello. I was like, hey, my friends must introduce us. So I'm Rob. I know your guys. Oh, yeah, blah, blah, blah and I got the hell out of there. Although now that I think of it, he was very struck by the fact that I lived right in the area and that I was and that I was a local guy because I remember him saying over and over again. So wait, you live right around here. You're like a local guy, you know? So you're right in the neighborhood. And I was like, yeah, so

Chuck Shute :

in New York.But in New York, you're saying? It was a couple of blocks in my house trying to get me to invite him over. I don't know. I don't know what was going on. You should have taken advantage of I could have hung out with Duff. That's cool. You guys probably have a lot in common though. You like a lot of the same music.

Rob Carlyle :

Yeah, honestly, it's it's funny. I don't know. But I know those guys know about me because I'm a when Frank was first rehearsing with the Duff and Slash, combo... I was giving them a hard time, I was texting him and I said something like, make sure you rehearse my band real good. For when we go out.

Chuck Shute :

Ah, that's funny.

Rob Carlyle :

Yeah. And then he texted me back and he said, I played The Compulsions for them. They love The Compulsions, right. So and then knowing me I said something like, "yeah, of course they love it. It sounds like they're already on it." I said something like that. So... and That's kinda like maybe the last time I spoke to Frank.

Unknown Speaker :

Um,

Chuck Shute :

So yeah, that's interesting. This was I found this interesting because usually when you when a band you know, parts ways with a member it says like, you know, this band parted ways, but they're the headline that I read with Richard and Frank it said, "The Compulsions fires Frank and Richard." And you know, I was just like, Wow, that's really like dramatic. Like you fired them. Like, you were like, pissed or something.

Rob Carlyle :

Yeah, that was I mean, I didn't know we were gonna get into this. I was like, keep it clean. But yeah, no, I'm going there. Yeah, that's cool. Um.... on a musical level we got along great.

Chuck Shute :

Yeah,

Rob Carlyle :

But that was about it. .There was a lot of dramatics,

Chuck Shute :

okay.

Rob Carlyle :

And if you want me to tell stories, honestly, I don't even remember the shit. I don't dwell on it. I just know how I felt at the time.

Chuck Shute :

Yeah.

Rob Carlyle :

And how I felt at that time was like, I don't need this anymore. They were great players. And I've played with a lot of guys who've been in and out of The Compulsions, and I could play you tracks and I could tell you which Richard and Frank on it, and you'll think it is, and it's not. So the point is, I played with a lot of guys, it wasn't and so, I'll be the first to admit, it wasn't until I started working with them on a more regular basis, that we will get in a lot more intention, and a lot more people coming to the shows, and a lot more clicks and likes and all that other kind of stuff. And there was, like I said, there was a lot of tension behind the scenes. I still don't know why, honestly, you would have to ask them. So I tolerated it. And I've said this before in interviews, I tolerated it for as long as I had to and then after a while, it was like well, we're not getting any bigger. Because they were very reluctant to help me promote the band in any kind of way. Right? Um, and I don't know what that was about. Um, there are, you know, to get your band out there, and people know about it. There's no other way for me to say this, but you got a whore yourself out there all over the fucking goddamn place. And nowadays, it's easier than ever, because you just got to press some buttons online, right? Mm hmm. And it was real hard to get them to do any of that kind of stuff. I'm sure they have their side of the story. You can ask them. Um, but again, I go back to this on a musical level. It was amazing. We got reviews. I always got great reviews. We continue to get amazing reviews like stuff like you know, by far one of the greatest underrated rock bands of our generation, stuff like that. I mean, The fact that you could just, you know, turn your nose up to that. It just it just boggles my mind. So again, you would have to ask them what the problem was. It wasn't me. I did everything I could. I knew what we had. And I knew it was amazing. Um, but again, I did great stuff with before them. I'm doing great stuff after them. I'm sure you heard the new album, right?

Chuck Shute :

Yeah. Um, yeah, we'll get to that. Yeah, for sure.

Unknown Speaker :

Yeah, no. Um,

Rob Carlyle :

So and that's kind of the point of the new album. One of the point is now that I know that people are paying attention, it's like, Listen, I'm the guy that's making this happen. You know, I write these fucking songs.

Chuck Shute :

Well, yeah. So you're the main songwriter.

Rob Carlyle :

The only songwriter

Chuck Shute :

Okay.

Rob Carlyle :

Yeah, I mean, there's been a little bit of help here and there. But like from producer here and there or, uh, there was another guitar player who contributed a riff 8 million years ago to one track, but by and large everything you see, everything you hear for better or worse is all coming from me. Gotcha How the songs sound, why they're in that key, why they're in that tempo - that's all me.

Chuck Shute :

Okay. All right, well, so then yeah, so you got rid of Frank and Richard and then you hired another Guns and Roses or former Guns and Roses guitars Bumblefoot, who is also amazing, talented guitarist. Now as he still he was a one time in Guns and Roses, but now he's a he's in Hookers and Blow and he's the frontman for the band Asia, which is like an 80s band. And he is he in your band too or did he just help out on this new album?

Rob Carlyle :

Um, so whether that's good or bad, I'll leave that up to you. I mean, to be honest with you, man, the only guy in my band right now is really me. Especially right now with you know, with the state of the world as Yeah, definitely not helping. But I'm the one I'm it's It's called the compulsions, which is ironic because it really is more of a solo project than anything else. Um, I would love to have these guys, uh, any of them more involved. But that you'd have to ask them, you know, they they're in other projects that are, I guess more lucrative or whatever. Yeah, Bumble is in 8 million projects.

Chuck Shute :

Oh, he's in sons of Apollo two, I think.

Rob Carlyle :

Right. There's that. Yeah. Um, so they're all doing a million things. Like I said, everybody's in a million bands. It definitely does not help my situation. Yeah. So it was like a catch 22 while I'd been in your band, I mean, this nobody has said this, but this is what I'm getting. While I'd be in your band, if it was making more money. Um, but how's it gonna make more money? If you're not gonna be in the goddamn band? You know what I mean? Right? So it's a non stop. It's a non stop. You know, catch 22 for sure. But you didn't you you were talking I heard you talking about

Chuck Shute :

touring Europe, were you able to get that tour? I mean, if you Tour de la besides just doing shows in New York,

Rob Carlyle :

that was me playing by myself with a guitar, you know? Yeah. Okay. And don't play don't play by himself with a guitar as well. We had, we had, you know, plugged in electric guitars, ah, we would join each other during each other set once in a while. He had a bass player that he was friends with show up. Um, so yeah, that was just the two of us and, and we brought the house down every time I have to say, um, luckily, you know, he's got a nice little underground, kind of following there. And between the two of us, you know, as we teamed up, we had a lot of fun both times. Maybe we'll do it again. I have no one right now who knows what's going on? So you never toured with you with a full band you never like toured the US? Or? Unfortunately not? No, I wish that I could tell you that I did. I've played some festivals like years ago. An early early version of the band and not with the name brand. And guys that you've mentioned, but yeah, I have been out to Wisconsin and Oklahoma. Stuff like that. Yeah, but okay. Yes. I was gonna say that's a good way to get notices the festivals or the cruises. Have you ever done one of the rock cruises? I have not. I've had people say they're gonna hook me up with that, um, it just hasn't come to fruition. Uh, yeah, I don't I'm not real good at that aspect of the business. Really? Maybe I should manage you. I feel like I love that kind of. Listen, man. You got a job?

Chuck Shute :

Yeah, you just got a high No, you're a hustler. Man you think you I think you're a hustler? A little bit.

Rob Carlyle :

Definitely mo hustler. But there's a limit to what you could do sometimes. Yeah. To a certain degree, unique cooperation. Well, it's all networking you know, easily per se Presley right? I had him on my show you I have you been on his show. I think you're friends with him on Facebook or Instagram. He hosts he does. He's

Chuck Shute :

Part of the Monsters of Rock cruise Oh, he's one of the hosts on that. I'm sure he knows some people that could probably could talk to. I mean, I feel like I see the list of those bands on those cruises and like, I mean they have like the big ones like the Cinderella's and the skid rows and queens, right. But then they have the, you know, real like, up and coming bands too. So I feel like you could get on somehow. All right, this is our pitch to the we'll get some press here. But let's talk about the the new record the new band that you've assembled. So we talked about bumblefoot on guitar. You got Earl slick on guitar, so if people don't know that is, this guy is a session player. He's played with David Bowie and john lennon. Please tell me you have a story from him about john lennon. He you must have he must have given you some john lennon story. He talked a lot about David Bowie, to be honest with you. I'm like every other sentence are really I'm joking. Yeah, he talked a lot about data. But one thing that he said about David Bowie that I that I thought was interesting was

Rob Carlyle :

That David told him was, um, I mean, something like, if you're not feeling good, like if you're down, don't go out, stay home. Don't let people see you down. He's like they'll see it in your face and and they'll think something's wrong and just stay the fuck home. Even if you got a show what about the show must go on what have you got shows? gotta show you gotta show but hanging out. I think we met as far as like, you know fraternizing and hanging out. Oh, you know, you know, socialize socializing, okay, you're not feeling it, just stay home. So that's, I mean, I don't know if that's the story you're looking for. But that's okay. I mean, it's not bad advice. No, but I was hoping like, you know, some crazy story about john lennon and Jimmy Page hanging out and a mud shark or something crazy like that. You know, Earl came over and it was really for a day a long day in the studio and I think he worked on five songs. He I sent him the material ahead of time, I sent all the guys the material ahead of time. So when they show up, they know what they want to do with it, right? Yeah, I made, I'll make, I may give some pointers or like, here's what I have in mind on the table, or I'll even like, send them another song by somebody else as a reference. I hear what they did here. Like, I'm kind of going for something like that. And everybody all down, everybody up and down. The line is amazing with that kind of stuff. I mean, they really everybody comes prepared with no shortage of ideas. And the songs always come out a million times even better than I thought they were going to come in. So that was that was the day with Earl Earl came in. I think we did five songs. Three of them are on this album. And, you know, we were only in there for like eight hour, you know, eight hour day and so but what I'm trying to tell you is there wasn't a lot of chitchat. Okay. went to work. Yeah. Playing the goddamn guitar. Um, and, um, and honestly, I would rather have

Chuck Shute :

That stuff then the stories you know what I mean? Sure, sure. No, you gotta choose Yeah. What about? I remember now? Yeah. And then Alec Morton. He's from raging slab. I don't know. That's a lesser known band. But I like that was a big fan of that. Are they in New York band?

Rob Carlyle :

Yeah, they okay you don't use anymore unfortunately. But yeah, in the early 90s they were like an amazing New York area band. I'd seen them at least half a dozen times I would see them I definitely saw a show that I'll never forget was them in monster magnet double

Chuck Shute :

Yeah, I remember them any club. It was just amazing. Both those bands I was found on Headbangers ball back when MTV is to be

Rob Carlyle :

brutal so good like such real rock and roll back to back I don't even remember who opened for who it didn't matter. They were like the same level of Yeah. intensity and excellence. Um, so yeah, so he was in raging slab a really awesome band people should check out the video for Don't dog me.

Chuck Shute :

Yeah. That's a good one.

Rob Carlyle :

Yeah. Um, so yeah, he's a super cool guy. I'm really easy to get along with. We talk all the time. Well, not all the time. But we do. We do talk about whatever I'm trying to do next. Yeah. So he's all over this album. Yeah. And then Brian Delaney who spent some time in the New York Dolls. Yeah, yeah, definitely. Yeah, he's another phenomenal drummer, super rock and roll, um, just gets it, you know? And, you know, these guys just from playing in the clubs in New York. Uh, you know, you know, it's all you know, you know, every one thing always leads to another. So I would say that, you know, Richard and Frank were when I came across them, you know, they did have, this is the early 2000s. At that point, they were session guys or playing, you know, in versions of the psychedelic fires or something with Richard Butler and stuff, so they weren't like, just dudes playing in a club. They weren't doing you know more real stuff. Um, but uh, so they were they were pretty accessible at that time and then also send me off was in that lineup as well and Sandy like live, you know, a couple of bucks a few blocks to me and he was hanging out in the clubs too. He was in New York Dolls in Hanoi rock, right? Yeah, yeah. So my point is, it wasn't that hard to get in touch with people. Okay. I mean, like, those somebody who knows somebody, you just get a phone number, you know, I'm saying and just, you know, God people want to work, you know, and if the material if they liked the material, um, it's all the better for them, I guess. Okay. Um, so and then. So anyway, so from playing with Sammy, uh, you know, I that just, in a way opened the door for me to just reach out to Brian Delaney. Okay, no, other awesome guy. Yeah. And, uh, and so you know, one thing Leeson and it was through Brian that I got real slicks contact information. Ah, But I, you know, I, you know, you could probably, you know, contact these people on Facebook, you know, Facebook where everybody has an everybody has a website nowadays with an email address. So, if if if the material is promising and the situation is is right, you know, people want to work, you know.

Chuck Shute :

Okay, very cool. So then let's talk about the new home ferocious job. What's that?

Rob Carlyle :

You can do it too?

Chuck Shute :

Yeah, no, I try to do a try to try to do something here but let's talk about your new album, "Ferocious". So you said there's a lot of violent imagery in the lyrics nasty and darkens spots, but also hilarious guns and axes to the end of the world. So the first song My first initial reaction, the first song born on the landfill, which I love the title, it sounds very much like and I hope this is a compliment. It sounds like Guns and Roses, not appetite, but sounds like the actually they use your illusions, which I love personally, and I think it's very underrated because a lot of people don't like to use your life. CDs they only like to apatite Would you agree with that? Like, some of the songs sound like that?

Rob Carlyle :

I mean, you know, that song is just a blues song. Really? Uh, you know, I don't know who owns that style of song. It's very Rolling Stones.

Chuck Shute :

Yeah.

Rob Carlyle :

And it's an open tuning. I'm open. I think it's an open G it's in the key of G. Um, yeah, I mean, listen, all the all these bands, whether it's Guns and Roses, or the stones, or AC DC or Aerosmith, you know, we're the Black Crowes. We're all drawn from the same, you know, well of influences. Yeah, it's the blue. Yeah, the blues. Well, you guys have to say must be the same influences. So and then I guess to answer your question, even more is like, yeah, I'm getting the blue. I got the blues from you know, Aerosmith who got it from the Rolling Stones who got him from the blues guys. And so, I'm sure the GNR guys were about this Same age, you know, they probably followed a similar path. Sure. So we process the stuff like through the same sort of filters more or less, right? And because you also have the punk the New York Dolls and all that kind of influences that they love to the dead boys like so. Yeah. So it may be a level of aggression in our music that maybe you wouldn't have found in some of the other bands that I just mentioned. Yeah, like, you know, we are we you know, and it's also it's modern day, we also have modern technology when we make these records so things could maybe sound punchy, or I don't know. Um, but I think the main thing is that it's just like, you know, we kind of are drawn from the same influences and come into like some very similar conclusion.

Chuck Shute :

Absolutely. Yeah. So your second the second songs, it's like toast takes a total 180 though. It's called band of thieves. And this songs sounds more like a Rob Zombie song, which is really cool.

Rob Carlyle :

I love Rob Zombie. Yeah,

Chuck Shute :

okay. Really. Yeah. Would you agree with that assessment thing? It's a little bit like, sounds like Rob Zombie?

Rob Carlyle :

Well, yeah, I've always, you know, I love you know, the to guitar rock and roll band setup. You know, that's the basis for everything. But I do love certain artists like Rob's on the mountain Manson that, that definitely pushed the envelope and they're not afraid to bring in, you know, drum machines and synthesizers, and just more. I don't know how to say it, but you know, off the wall modern day, you know, productions and so, the band ifif song is definitely influenced by that and actually also very influenced by um, if you saw a Fury Road, I'm mad max. Yeah, yeah. Yeah. The guy who the guy who did the music to that is a guy named Junkie XL. And, um, yeah, and I've listened to that soundtrack quite a few times, and we definitely, I was definitely influenced by the Fury Road movie. movie, okay, I love that movie. It's great in in the writing and the production of that song and even like what the songs about yeah and Eve's it's kind of written so you don't know I read it, I wrote it. So hopefully it was vague say like, is he talking about a biker gang? Or was he talking about a rock and roll band? Or it's like, it's kind of a you know, it's kind of written to be interpreted, like most of my stuff, multiple ways. Cool. Yeah, no, and then the third song is called addicted and this sounds kind of like the first song and the second song. And you know how to baby basically it's kind of like Rob Zombie meets Guns and Roses. I really liked the baseline. Unless Did you write that baseline? Or did you have Alec come up with that? I had to be he probably came up with okay. Yeah, and that's, I love that song. That's, that's something really it's just one chord. It's just a chord all the way through. There's no changes this couple of stops, but yeah, it's just this hypnotic. It was me just trying to do you know, you know, my version of like a Jimmy Page risk. Yeah, sign of that. And then bumblefoot is just going crazy over the whole thing. Okay. So um yeah, that I love that I love that track

Chuck Shute :

is bumblefoot does he play on the funks number 666 because I love the guitar on that with a wah wah pedal. It's got a great solo. That's Oh yeah, he tore that up man. That was really good.

Rob Carlyle :

He did such an incredible job. You know? If you like this stuff, too, you know, I put out um, I put up some singles with him in 2016 we did a cover of we covered revolution and we covered shocked me and we covered fascination Street. Yes. It's not like the beginning of our working together. Um, and then you know, he's just really easy to get along with and, you know, certainly knows how to play guitar. Oh, yeah, definitely. Yeah, no, you got the rest of the songs all really good. I like I also liked the Dustin bones cover. That's a Guns and Roses song. I think

Chuck Shute :

I think that that song and that whole those whole albums are so underrated so it's cool to hear a cover of that I thought that and it was like you did it differently. You didn't just it wasn't a totally faithful cover, which I think if you're going to cover song, I think you should kind of mix it up. Also the same with your cover of dead flowers. You also, which is a song that I don't have Guns and Roses covered up, but I think the gilby Clarke cover it and Axel sang on it. I've heard them do it. And so it was cool to hear that to

Rob Carlyle :

know what everybody's covered that song.

Chuck Shute :

Yeah, that's a good it's a good song, which

Rob Carlyle :

is such a real good song to cover. I mean, it's just simple cowboy chords, you know, and like you could do it in so many different styles. It's just wide open. I mean, there's obviously the stones version, but then we did it more like I don't know, more of a punk rock media portion but with like, you know, shredding guitars on top of it but yeah, many people have covered that song and it's just a real just the the mark of a great song is when people want to cover it and also can cover in so many different ways. Yeah.

Chuck Shute :

Because yours is definitely a more of an original version. It's not again, it's not it's like the Guns and Roses. It's not a totally faithful just a cookie cutter copy, you know version. It's like you're actually putting your style and your stamp on it, which I think is the best covers.

Rob Carlyle :

That's what we try and do.

Chuck Shute :

Yeah, that's awesome. And then I love the dirtbag blues, though. I think I heard you talking about because I only heard clips of the song. So is this song only 48 seconds long? Yeah, it's a 4640 seconds long. I I gave myself an assignment. You know, years ago. Yeah.

Rob Carlyle :

Which was like to write try and write the fit not only fast and speed, but like the shortest amount of time. Like, can I tell a whole story in less than a minute. So there's an album we have called beat the devil and if you look at that, there's a song called Eat my dust. That's 60 seconds long. It's like this Motorhead, you know, jam. Um, and then And then I did this song which is, um, dirtbag blue is another another less than a minute song. I've got a couple others in the pipeline. There's another one called shake that Fang that we do too. There's two versions of that there's a slow version and an A fast version. And actually the song up at the top that we talked about born on a landfill I was trying to write that that was going to be a 60 seconds. I was trying to tell my life story and like the shortest amount of time possible. Um, so that's kind of what the inspiration was between a behind I'm born on the landfill I was trying to write that was gonna that was gonna I was gonna try and make that another 60 seconds.

Unknown Speaker :

What

Chuck Shute :

What do you mean that that's like your life story? Like you weren't literally born on a landfill or? Well, I was born in Staten Island. I don't know if you know anything.

Unknown Speaker :

But there was that the giant you know, Fresh Kills. landfill that was there for the longest. time they've since paved it over, but I just wanted to you know, that was my that was my assignment. Yeah. Okay. Move on top of a landfill. Yeah. Look at your nation. Let your imagination take that one.

Chuck Shute :

Yeah. So what's it like? I mean, right now, there's a lot going on in the world. Does that inspire you to pick up a guitar and make songs about it? Because, I mean, I know for myself as a podcaster I, man, there's probably not a lot I can do to save the world, especially as a white male. You know, there's not a lot I can do to save but you know, as a musician, you can maybe inspire people with your songs. I don't know. Do you think about that? Do you think about some of these songs? Do they inspire you to write? You know, like a john lennon type, peaceful song that can bring the world together? You know, I

Unknown Speaker :

it does. Um, I have done even on the last album. It was a song called evil bastards, which was like this. It was just about the sins of human that's a great title. Yeah, it's a pretty it's a pretty fucking dark song. And it's a pretty Angry sign it's I love that song. So there's you know so I have written stuff you know based on what I see on TV and see out on the street I'm so evil bastards would be one funk number 666 is definitely I mean we I get right into like, I take that all the way up to the apocalypse with the four horsemen coming in and all that kind of stuff. And it seems to you know, I wrote that thing five years ago and it's unfortunately seems more relevant now than ever before. And then yeah, I have this a couple other things in the pipeline that are you know if you heard them even the reclusive song that I have, um, I wrote that long before we were all you know, locked down and if I put it out today, you would think oh, he wrote this because he was locked down. You know, actually had it actually had it in the in the works way longer. So I'm I inspired I mean, to be honest with you, I kind of feel like funk number 666 covers everything. I don't know what more I can say right now. I'm not really in songwriting mode. For the first time in a real long time, I've been playing guitar a lot. Just to be honest with you. I've been, you know, working on becoming a better guitar player. I have so many songs, in the words that I'm going to put out that I really, as a creative person, I don't really feel the need to write anything, but I got 20 fucking songs to fucking finish, isn't it? But I don't need any more work. It doesn't

Chuck Shute :

inspire you like because isn't that when you are most driven to pick up a guitar? Like when a heartbreak? I've heard that it's easier to write a song when you're in a place of pain than if you're feeling really good. You're not gonna be like, Oh, I can't wait to write a nice happy song. I definitely

Unknown Speaker :

Yeah, that definitely seems to be true. But again, I've I feel like I feel like I have to finish the songs I got started before. Honestly, and unless somebody wants me to write a song for them, yeah. I'd be happy to. But as far as me what's going on in my life, you know, I'm good. Like, I got have enough material to discuss. And yeah, and it's a real common cool feeling to be honest with you. Because to answer your question, there was a time when like, I would try and turn every little goddamn thing into a song. Yeah, like how, not only get a song out of this, and I did. Um, but I feel real good now. I mean, I feel real satisfied as a songwriter. I don't feel like I need to write anything more. I have, like I said, at least 20 songs in the can that I need to get finished off. And for me, the focus right now is when it comes to rock and roll. It's like I just want to be a better guitar player. Okay. That's probably the thing that I've neglected the most. All these years is my guitar playing. And I feel like I've had to, I've been responsible for so many other aspects of being in a band or running a band or whatever, that the guitar playing has really fallen by the wayside. And, and the whole reason you know, I'm I love doing this is For the goddamn guitar, you know, I just love playing guitar. And so you just want to be a better guitar player and there's I don't think there's any guitar player worth his or her soul that you would talk to that would say that they don't want to be a better guitar player like everybody wants to be. So

Chuck Shute :

how do you become a better guitar player? You got to take lessons or just practicing more?

Unknown Speaker :

That's a great question. I mean, you know, playing the thing for starters, but yeah, yeah, I should have a more regimented, um, you know, I should have I should I should be doing lessons or something like I should be taking that more seriously. Um, but just figuring out stuff, you know, that I just should have figured out years ago. It's kind of like life, um, you know, just figuring out stuff that that just makes all the difference. You know, little it's little things here and there. I think it's 8 million things, you know,

Chuck Shute :

well, that's what I heard. Somebody talking about that the other day that success is not sexy. It's just an accumulation of little little things and habits over a long period of time. That leads to Great, amazing things.

Rob Carlyle :

So yeah, totally, totally. And some of us, you know, we learn different things at different rates at different times in our life. Yeah, you know, definitely the game is over, you know until you're in the grave. So yeah, so when does this new album The ferocious when does it come out? Is it November October? Yeah, this is um, the the combine the whole thing on November 13. Okay. 20 but right now, you can go to iTunes and preorder it and you'll get you'll get dead flowers and Dustin bones instantly.

Chuck Shute :

Okay.

Rob Carlyle :

Yeah, yeah.

Chuck Shute :

So that's cool. So and you said, you know, like, you go to the website and see all these reviews that you have from a lot of critics have really given you guys good reviews. Do you have other people that are fans like, because I like I said, I thought maybe Guns and Roses. I mean, it sounds like they are kind of fans. You think there's other bands out there that are fans of you that maybe would take you on as an opening band or something like that, or...

Rob Carlyle :

well, you know what's funny is I became I had a few conversations with a guy named um Oh, I His name is escaping me right now. I should know this. Um, who was the bass player? Who is Oh, Jimmy Ashhurts. I don't know, you know who that is. He was in the Juju hounds.

Chuck Shute :

Oh, yeah. Izzy's band.

Rob Carlyle :

Yeah. And he was in Buckcherry too. I think he's friends with the other guys that we mentioned earlier (Richard Fortus & Frank Ferrer?).

Chuck Shute :

Okay.

Rob Carlyle :

And one of my conversations with him, he told me that on more than one occasion, Buckcherry reached out to someone in the Compulsions about opening up for Buckcherry. And they were told that we were too busy. Now, I can tell you, nobody reached out to me. So I don't know who they talked to.

Chuck Shute :

Yeah.

Rob Carlyle :

But no one came around and told me "Hey, Rob, by the way, so and so from Buckcherry reached out to me and wanted to know if we wanted to open up for them, I told them we were too busy, but just wanted you to know." So, so to answer your question, there's things like that for the most part from what I seen, you know, even though it looks maybe to the outside person that there's like a brotherhood going on out there. It looks to me, like everybody kind of keeps to themselves and it's like your family versus my family, my getting versus your gang. I would welcome that kind of support or interest or whatever. But it hasn't really come my way. In fact, maybe the opposite....if you know what I mean. Um, so yeah, nobody...

Chuck Shute :

What do you mean the opposite? No, I don't know what you mean.

Rob Carlyle :

No, there's just, you know, unfair competition and just sabotage and that kind of bullshit. You know, I'm...

Chuck Shute :

Really? Like people trying to not let get you give you opportunities.

Rob Carlyle :

Um, I don't think anybody's in a rush to help anybody. I'll put it that way. Okay. I don't think anybody's in a rush though. It's too tough out there to help really help anybody. Well, I'm trying to help every musician that I can't anyone that comes on my show is is that once you're a guest on my show, I help you for the rest of your life as much as I can. I mean, not that I have a lot of followers or anything, but no, I really appreciate that. That's awesome, but I don't really that's not been my experience, you know? Um, so. Yeah. But anyway, yeah, somebody reached out somebody from Buckcherry reached out to one of my guys a couple of times from what I'm told. And, and they were told that we were too busy but the message never got to me. Well, that sucks cuz I think you and Buckcherry I would definitely pay to see that show for sure. That'd be amazing. It would have been phenomenal. Yeah, I just heard their their guitarist actually just stepped down. Did you see that? I did hear about that. Yeah, yeah. Hey, maybe you could step in and be their guitar boy.

Unknown Speaker :

Sure.

Chuck Shute :

Do you think that the rock and roll image of like sleazy party rock is just like, not PC in 2020 anymore? Because you kind of have that kind of, you know, do even with the album artwork and some of the titles and the lyrics. I mean, it's kind of sleazy, you know, rock it sometimes I kind of like almost like get scared when I when I listen to some of this stuff because I go, Oh gosh, the, you know, the me to crowd or whatever is going to be for this guy or, you know, and I I mean, that's great. Well, I mean, I could tell you, I'm, I've lived it. Um, and I'm still living it. Um, but, uh, you know, as far as you know, people being offended by anything what a tough shit, you know, I

Unknown Speaker :

mean, like, I mean, if we could sit there and poke we could sit here sit there and have issue with, you know, fucking Chuck Berry mind boggling his biggest song of all time. You know what I mean? Like, that's true. Yeah, I didn't think of that. Yeah, you just can't sit there and like second guess yourself and worry about offending people because, like, we're offended by something with this, the rotating list of topics that were offended by, if you try and sit there and like, make everybody happy, you'll just never make a record. Yeah, me, but just put it out. And then, you know, time will tell whether it's, you know, offensive or not. And I think that, you know, I'm, I have a lot of different types of people, I'm fortunate to say a lot of different types of people that love my stuff. And, and it's an honor and they know where I'm coming from. And they know, you know, what, when it's funny, and and, and, and they know when it's, you know, you know, got the best intentions behind it and stuff like that. And so right because yeah,

Chuck Shute :

is that kind of an expression. That's how you express some of these feelings that I mean, Guns and Roses things. I used to love her, but I had to kill her. I mean, they didn't really kill anybody, but maybe that's how they're expressing the feelings of like, being angry at somebody and maybe that's a good way to get that anger out to listen to a song or write a song.

Unknown Speaker :

There's always going to be that type of stuff, whether it's in hip hop or whether it Yeah. Whether it's in some old country song about killing your girlfriend or whatever,

Chuck Shute :

or the new cardi B song. Have you ever seen that one?

Unknown Speaker :

No. What is she talking about?

Chuck Shute :

The wet asked pussy. You haven't seen that one?

Unknown Speaker :

Okay, no. That one, not that one.

Chuck Shute :

You got to see that video. It's pretty graphic. Yeah,

Unknown Speaker :

yeah. So I mean, you got to go there sometimes. Yeah, you got it. But you know, I also try not be like, Oh, just go one dimensional artists can only do that. Right. Like, there's a time and a place for a dirty joke, you know, but then there's also a time and a place with some, like, you know, deep meaningful stuff. Mm hmm. So if you listen to the record, you know, the goal is to try and you know, check all those boxes.

Chuck Shute :

Yeah. Do you think that you'll try? Are you going to try to get some of the songs license to movies and TVs and commercials because I feel like that's the greatest way to make Money with recording. I mean, obviously touring is a big part of musicians now but in terms of album sales that just you're just not getting the you know, even the biggest names are not getting the the money from that. So do you try to do the licensing?

Rob Carlyle :

Yeah, I have a guy that I worked with. I've gotten some songs on some things like we even had a song on like one of those on a on a Showtime series. Oh, really? Yeah, it was a small snippet of a song. But you know, you get paid for that. So there's things here and there that you can try and do get, you know, get your songs into maybe commercials or whatever. Yeah, that kind of stuff does happen. Yeah, for sure. I mean, the dream is you want the opening sequence on some, you know, HBO miniseries Yeah, no. Um, so, you know, anything can happen. Yeah. So for what is one other? Sorry? and probably will and pre yeah, hopefully. So what other goals do you have for the band? What do you want to do? Would you I mean, would you want to do an opening to tour with Buckcherry or what what would be your biggest goal? Well, right Now everything is up in the air. And I mean, I don't know what anybody's doing right now. So that's why that's why I figured let me just first of all, this record has been, I've been working on this record for five years. Um, and while I'm working on that record, like I said before, I have like another two albums, at least with the material. So it's been like these 30 plus songs, just, you know, working on them and moving them forward as fast as possible. And these were the first 10 that came together, or the for this package of 10 seemed to really work well.

Chuck Shute :

Okay.

Rob Carlyle :

And so, to answer your question, what's the goal? I mean... this is things are just so crazy right now, like we're even talking to some I don't know if this is going to happen, and I can't get into too many details about it. But there's a guy out there who is a promoter who has an idea for a remote, a socially distanced concert series, and he's got an interesting spin on it, which I'm not going to give away because it's his idea and ...

Chuck Shute :

Okay,

Rob Carlyle :

I don't know if we're gonna do it or not. But, the goal is to really play out more. I mean, that's the one thing that I haven't really been able to do as much as I want to with with this band is to play out more. But that would be awesome. You know, if somebody wanted to write a song with me I wanted a month month me to write a song for them that would be sick. You know, Jimmy Page wants to give me a call.,

Chuck Shute :

yeah,

Rob Carlyle :

I know, for something. Whatever Iggy Pop wants to do something?

Chuck Shute :

Yeah.

Rob Carlyle :

Oh, yeah.

Chuck Shute :

Well, you're a hustler. Like I said, I mean, you reach out to all these other guys. You just keep reaching out to people.

Rob Carlyle :

You know, haven't reached out to Jimmy Page.

Chuck Shute :

Yeah, why not?

Rob Carlyle :

Maybe I should. Yeah. Well, I don't know. I don't know that he's gonna dig my singing style. He seems to like, you know, you know, it's hard to feel Robert plant's shoes.

Chuck Shute :

Yeah, that's tough. But But, um, but yeah, I I'm not shy about reaching out to people. And I do. I do. Do that once in a while.

Rob Carlyle :

Right now I just my focus has been just, you know, get this album out. I'm going to be doing some publicity for it, including your show, which Thank you very much. And yeah, I mean, playing out is always the goal. But right now, ain't nobody playing it. Yeah. All right. Well, yeah. Thanks so much for doing my show. I do like to end with a charity. So you mentioned the World Resources Institute. Can you tell me about that? I looked up a little bit. Yeah, I mean, they're just they have so many, they just have so many different things that they do. But the main, the main goal is that, you know, we have to do more to weigh more to keep the environment or get the environment in better shape, because we're just not going to be here. Um, if we just keep going along this path. I mean, look at the situation that we're in now. I mean, ever. A lot of people have a theory on why we're here but I think it's just because, you know, we're just doing too much too fast. You know, and too many of us

Unknown Speaker :

doing it.

Chuck Shute :

Well isn't. It's interesting though, because didn't the I think was it Italy or one of those European countries when they locked down? Like they said the environment just totally changed like these animals came back to life that, you know, that had never been seen in those areas. And I think you're talking about the canals in Venice, though. Yeah. I don't know if that was fake news or what but yeah, I mean, I there's definitely been some, like, measurable changes in the environment with the lockdowns which is really interesting.

Unknown Speaker :

Yeah. And I'm not surprised because, again, you know, I just feel like we're just doing way too much too fast. Um, and I think we ought to really examine that. And I'm sad to say that I don't think we're gonna, I think we're all itching, everybody's itching to get back to their schemes in their scams as soon as possible. That you know, I'm very worried about you know, the future and what's going to happen because it doesn't seem like you know, we're supposed to be in this reflective mood, but I don't see it is reflective. You know, state perhaps, and I don't I don't necessarily see it. I just I think there's all the self centered, you know, people out there. I think they're just waiting, you know, itching to get back to that, you know, and that's how we got here in the first place.

Chuck Shute :

Yeah, it's sad. I mean, I tried to enter the charity trying to do something better for the world. So I mean, if you want to go to that website, they can check it out. And then people should definitely check your stuff out. You're on all this. You're not a fan of social media. I heard you say, but you are on it regardless, right? I think you're on Twitter and Instagram and Facebook and spot your musics on Spotify and YouTube and Pandora.

Unknown Speaker :

Yeah, yeah. That the music based stuff. Yes. On Instagram. Yes. Facebook, I have my personal account. There's a YouTube page. Um, you know, and again, you know, the album is available right now if people preorder it, they'll get him The, the, they'll get dead flowers. They'll get a version of dead flowers and like an old version of Dustin bones. So you know, I do I do what I have to Do all right. Well, that's great. Well, thanks so much for coming on my show. Is there anything else you want to promote or tell people to do or just keep checking the page because there's updates going to be coming? Okay, check the website. It's the compulsions. NYC calm. Like I said, there may be some live performances in the very near future. I don't know if it's going to be a full band thing. Okay, my knee or might be both. So this stuff, there's stuff happening and there's, you know, um,

Rob Carlyle :

you know, this press coming out. There's other podcasts and stuff like that. So, you know, there's going to be, um, hopefully some more entertainment coming from me for people.

Chuck Shute :

Oh, that's good. Yeah. Well, hopefully you can eventually do a show down here. Or if you do a show in New York, maybe I can come up there. And I got those. I've interviewed a bunch of comedians from New York, and so I'd love to see them and see you live. That'd be cool. That'd be amazing. Yeah, man. Just let me know when you're in town. Okay. Well, dude, thanks so much, Rob. Thank you, Chuck. All right. Bye. So there you have it. Rob Carla from the company. The new album is called ferocious comes out November in November 13. He said, check the website and check his social media, follow him on social media for updates. You can follow me on social media as well. If you enjoyed this interview, share it with a friend or you can write me a review if you are really feeling like doing a nice thing for me. And other than that, I have a great day or night if you're listening at night, and just remember, shoot for the moon.